Hypegram : Review: Marvel's Ant-Man And The Wasp -- What Infinity War? ARTICLE 160609706 Review: Marvel's Ant-Man And The Wasp -- What Infinity War? english ARTICLE

There's a recurring source of tension in thanks to Scott Lang's sentence of two years under house arrest for his actions in . No matter how many zany adventures Paul Rudd's character has in this sequel, he has to periodically race back to his San Francisco apartment and re-don his ankle bracelet whenever hapless FBI agent Jimmy Woo (the funny Randall Park) decides to check in on him. It's a fun bit, and it harks back to an earlier age in the MCU, when a Marvel hero's biggest concern could be staying out of trouble with the law.

We've yet to see what a post- world looks like in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Regardless of how it eventually gets undone, what effect will Thanos's finger snap have in the short term? How will the tone shift in Avengers 4? Those questions are irrelevant in , which quickly places itself before the events of . That may be a knock against it for those hoping for some answers, but this movie's tone is much lighter as a result, perfectly in line with the original 's.

The first introduced Scott Lang (Rudd) along with Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) and his daughter Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly). directly picks up their story following Scott's involvement in : Scott's two years of house arrest are almost up, but Hope drags him back into a life of illegal heroism in a plot to save her mother, Michelle Pfeiffer's Janet van Dyne, from the "quantum realm" in which she's been stranded for 30 years.

How can Janet be alive down there after all this time? How could Hank and Hope possibly find her? This movie is brimming with pseudo-scientific mumbo jumbo about things like "entanglement" and "quantum tunnels." It gets a little exhausting, but the movie is self aware about its own ridiculousness; at one point, Scott asks Hank and his colleague Bill Foster (Laurence Fishburne) whether they just stick the word "quantum" in front of everything to make it sound more scientific. Good question, Scott!

introduces a couple of new villains in the forms of Hannah John-Kamen's Ghost, who stalks the heroes in hopes of stealing their secret lab, and Walton Goggins' Sonny Burch, a black market merchant who decides he wants the quantum tech for himself. Goggins is his typical hilariously sleazy self, while John-Kamen's more overtly dramatic performance fits her character.

But most important is the Wasp herself, Evangeline Lilly's Hope van Dyne, who completely owns this movie. Hope proves--unsurprisingly--to be a much more capable Ant-Man than Ant-Man himself, with confidence and skill that are thrilling to watch. It makes the entire plot of the first movie--that Hank had to enlist the deadbeat Scott in the first place instead of just trusting his daughter to do the job--seem even more ludicrous in retrospect. Hopefully Lilly decides to stick around the MCU for a while, as her presence would be much appreciated in future installments.

Like the first , this movie has great fight choreography that sees both heroes frequently changing from normal to small to massive and back again in creative ways. Some of the most fun sequences are car chases where one or more vehicles are constantly shrinking down to Hot Wheels size and back to normal, throwing off pursuers and causing general zany chaos.

There's an added dash of humor from the fact that Scott's suit for much of the movie is malfunctioning, leaving him unable to control when he changes size. That leads to an especially funny sequence where Scott is running around his daughter's middle school at about 3 feet tall, trying to remain undetected. Cassie herself is still played by the ridiculously charismatic Abby Ryder Fortson, who gives Paul Rudd tit-for-tat in every scene they're in together.

Michael Peña's Luis returns with a vengeance too, with his voice-overed montage gag from the first--in which he tells a story while the characters he's describing act it out--is funnier than ever. This time around he gets injected with a sort of truth serum, causing his rapid fire rambling to span topics ranging from Scott's psychiatric health to his family's love of Morrissey. He's more actively involved in the story, as well, which is pure wish fulfillment for viewers who loved his character in the first movie.

Like the original is primarily a palette cleanser in the MCU as a whole (the first movie was sandwiched in between the dense Age of Ultron and the dour Civil War). is hilarious, fun, silly, self aware, and creative. Filled with pseudo-science gobbledigook, crazy action, and multiple villains all vying for screen time, it's one of the most comic-booky MCU movies yet. The fates of all our favorite heroes after Avengers: Infinity War may still be up in the air, but in the meantime, is a welcome distraction.

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Review: Marvel's Ant-Man And The Wasp -- What Infinity War?


GameSpot
73 d ago

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There's a recurring source of tension in thanks to Scott Lang's sentence of two years under house arrest for his actions in . No matter how many zany adventures Paul Rudd's character has in this sequel, he has to periodically race back to his San Francisco apartment and re-don his ankle bracelet whenever hapless FBI agent Jimmy Woo (the funny Randall Park) decides to check in on him. It's a fun bit, and it harks back to an earlier age in the MCU, when a Marvel hero's biggest concern could be staying out of trouble with the law.

We've yet to see what a post- world looks like in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Regardless of how it eventually gets undone, what effect will Thanos's finger snap have in the short term? How will the tone shift in Avengers 4? Those questions are irrelevant in , which quickly places itself before the events of . That may be a knock against it for those hoping for some answers, but this movie's tone is much lighter as a result, perfectly in line with the original 's.

The first introduced Scott Lang (Rudd) along with Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) and his daughter Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly). directly picks up their story following Scott's involvement in : Scott's two years of house arrest are almost up, but Hope drags him back into a life of illegal heroism in a plot to save her mother, Michelle Pfeiffer's Janet van Dyne, from the "quantum realm" in which she's been stranded for 30 years.

How can Janet be alive down there after all this time? How could Hank and Hope possibly find her? This movie is brimming with pseudo-scientific mumbo jumbo about things like "entanglement" and "quantum tunnels." It gets a little exhausting, but the movie is self aware about its own ridiculousness; at one point, Scott asks Hank and his colleague Bill Foster (Laurence Fishburne) whether they just stick the word "quantum" in front of everything to make it sound more scientific. Good question, Scott!

introduces a couple of new villains in the forms of Hannah John-Kamen's Ghost, who stalks the heroes in hopes of stealing their secret lab, and Walton Goggins' Sonny Burch, a black market merchant who decides he wants the quantum tech for himself. Goggins is his typical hilariously sleazy self, while John-Kamen's more overtly dramatic performance fits her character.

But most important is the Wasp herself, Evangeline Lilly's Hope van Dyne, who completely owns this movie. Hope proves--unsurprisingly--to be a much more capable Ant-Man than Ant-Man himself, with confidence and skill that are thrilling to watch. It makes the entire plot of the first movie--that Hank had to enlist the deadbeat Scott in the first place instead of just trusting his daughter to do the job--seem even more ludicrous in retrospect. Hopefully Lilly decides to stick around the MCU for a while, as her presence would be much appreciated in future installments.

Like the first , this movie has great fight choreography that sees both heroes frequently changing from normal to small to massive and back again in creative ways. Some of the most fun sequences are car chases where one or more vehicles are constantly shrinking down to Hot Wheels size and back to normal, throwing off pursuers and causing general zany chaos.

There's an added dash of humor from the fact that Scott's suit for much of the movie is malfunctioning, leaving him unable to control when he changes size. That leads to an especially funny sequence where Scott is running around his daughter's middle school at about 3 feet tall, trying to remain undetected. Cassie herself is still played by the ridiculously charismatic Abby Ryder Fortson, who gives Paul Rudd tit-for-tat in every scene they're in together.

Michael Peña's Luis returns with a vengeance too, with his voice-overed montage gag from the first--in which he tells a story while the characters he's describing act it out--is funnier than ever. This time around he gets injected with a sort of truth serum, causing his rapid fire rambling to span topics ranging from Scott's psychiatric health to his family's love of Morrissey. He's more actively involved in the story, as well, which is pure wish fulfillment for viewers who loved his character in the first movie.

Like the original is primarily a palette cleanser in the MCU as a whole (the first movie was sandwiched in between the dense Age of Ultron and the dour Civil War). is hilarious, fun, silly, self aware, and creative. Filled with pseudo-science gobbledigook, crazy action, and multiple villains all vying for screen time, it's one of the most comic-booky MCU movies yet. The fates of all our favorite heroes after Avengers: Infinity War may still be up in the air, but in the meantime, is a welcome distraction.

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GameSpot -- No Score
"Like the original Ant-Man, Ant-Man and the Wasp is primarily a palette cleanser in the MCU as a whole (the first movie was sandwiched in between the dense Age of Ultron and the dour Civil War). Ant-Man and the Wasp is hilarious, fun, silly, self aware, and creative. Filled with pseudo-science gobbledigook, crazy action, and multiple villains all vying for screen time, it's one of the most comic-booky MCU movies yet. The fates of all our favorite heroes after Avengers: Infinity War may still be up in the air, but in the meantime, Ant-Man and the Wasp is a welcome distraction." -- Michael Rougeau [ Full Review ]
Den of Geek -- 2.5/5
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CNET -- No Score
"Ant-Man and The Wasp takes the stakes and scale of a typically colossal Marvel film and brings them down to the most intimate level, focusing on families in this love letter to father-daughter relationships.The 20th Marvel Cinematic Universe film is a light, welcome break from the mess that is reality -- more specifically from thinking about the epic scale of destruction in Avengers: Infinity War. It's a silly, fun comedy, well-timed after the superhero smashes of the last few months, with an easy-to-follow plot (even with multiple foes) and a whole lot of love, making it one of the best MCU sequels." -- Caitlin Petrakovitz and Eric Franklin [ Full Review ]
ComicBook.com -- No Score
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ScreenRant -- 3.5/5
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Variety -- No Score
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IndieWire -- B-
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Vox -- 3/5
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In the first scene we get a look at what Scott, Hope, Hank, and Jan have been up to in the time immediately after Jan's return. They've taken their lab-sized bridge to the Quantum Realm and either totally rebuilt it or just conveniently shrunk it down with Pym Particles to fit in the back of a van, and now, Scott's about to make the jump. This time, he's not on a rescue mission, but after more "quantum particles," which he alludes to being part of Ghost's "cure" (the solution to her problem of phasing in and out of different quantum states uncontrollably).
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It's a pretty bleak fate, given how obscure the Quantum Realm is to begin with, and with Hank, Jan, and Hope gone, the list of people smart enough to engineer a way to reach him--or even aware that the Quantum Realm exists--shrinks pretty dramatically.
The second post-credits scene takes place immediately after the first. We're taken to the Lang house--eerily deserted, with the TV cut to an emergency broadcasting channel. Upstairs, the giant ant "stand in" Hope programmed to mimic Scott's routine keeps on keeping on, oblivious to the apocalypse, playing Scott's drum set.
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With abilities like that, or with the quantum particles he harvested (and, maybe, can continue to harvest), there's a whole new list of potential failsafes against the Infinity Stones. It's probable--maybe even likely--that when the Stones destroy matter, they're not actually vaporizing it, but instead forcing it to phase out of our reality into another--maybe even into a place that is touching or related to the Quantum Realm. Failing that, it's certainly more than possible that the quantum particles are a way in which the Stones can be reliably counteracted; even if people were literally reduced to dust, if quantum particles can alter the fabric of reality, what's to say they couldn't reach into an alternate universe and pull a new version of a vaporized person back into our dimension?
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As illustrated in the images below, any movie that's subject to Peak Pricing will be denoted with a red lightning bolt icon above the showtime, with the cost of the surcharge detailed on the confirmation screen. Showtimes that will potentially enter Peak Pricing are denoted with a grey lightning bolt icon, though they won't yet charge an additional fee.
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Warning: Spoilers follow for Ant-Man and the Wasp.
By now, you know the drill: Never, ever leave during the end credits of a Marvel movie. 
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Marvel Studios ANT-MAN AND THE WASP..Ant-Man/Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) in the Quantum Realm..Photo: Film Frame..©Marvel Studios 2018 Read more...
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74 d ago
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Photo Illustration by Sarah Rogers/The Daily Beast
When Peyton Reed inherited the mantle of Ant-Man director from Edgar Wright , who left midway through the Marvel caper he’d scripted about a hero who shrinks to fantastical bug-sized proportions, the idea of the Quantum Realm had not yet touched paper. It was Reed and co-writer Adam McKay who thought to create for the screen a version of the alternate dimension where human concepts of space and time become irrelevant, opening a Pandora’s Box of reality-bending possibilities.
Now, three years and one cataclysmic shift in the Marvel Cinematic Universe later, their idea may hold the key to reversing the cruelest events of Avengers: Infinity War—or so heartbroken fans might hope.
Ant-Man and the Wasp, Reed’s sunny sequel to his 2015 superhero-origin-heist-story starring Paul Rudd , comes on the heels of the darkest entry in the Marvel canon yet. Thanos, that purple menace now armed with all-powerful abilities, has decimated the Avengers and pulverized half the universe, including marquee heroes like Spider-Man, Black Panther, and the Guardians of the Galaxy (minus poor Rocket).
Read more at The Daily Beast.
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Ars Technica
74 d ago
Ant-Man and the Wasp review: Even smaller scale, even bigger heart
Enlarge (credit: Marvel Studios)
For some fans, 2015's Ant-Man was a breath of fresh air after the save-the-world insanity of many other Marvel Studios films. But that comic series' small-suit, big-screen debut was still glued to Avengers plot lines, which arguably dragged its momentum and fun. (This fact may have caused a rift between Marvel and the film's original director, Edgar Wright, who was rumored to have a sillier, more standalone film in mind before leaving Ant-Man.)
A few years later, the Avengers side of things is even more insane. Ant-Man was noticeably absent from Infinity War, and this week's Ant-Man and the Wasp explains why: to give Infinity War haters a silly, one-off antidote. Basically, Wright's reported vision has finally emerged, one film later.
Everything good about Ant-Man—its heart, its humor, and its brisk take on smaller-scale superhero action—is back and better. By focusing on its best characters, Ant-Man and the Wasp makes room for convincing relationships and character-building; it makes viewers give a crap about its cast... and forgive the film's few imperfections.
Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments
Fox News
74 d ago
'Ant-Man and The Wasp' star Evangeline Lilly reveals she was ready to quit acting
“Ant-Man and The Wasp” star Evangeline Lilly revealed Thursday she decided to retire from acting after finishing the hit series “Lost” and another film before director Peter Jackson pulled her back in.
USA Today
74 d ago
Review: With superhero sting, Evangeline Lilly leads fun-loving 'Ant-Man and the Wasp'
Paul Rudd's shrinking hero returns in 'Ant-Man and the Wasp,' but it's Evangeline Lilly who's got the most sting in the fun-loving sequel.
         
 
 
New York Times
72 d ago
The Science (and the Scientists) Behind ‘Ant-Man’
A quantum physicist consulted with the filmmakers so that a surprising amount of the original film and its new sequel have a factual basis.
CNET News
74 d ago
The best and worst things about Ant-Man and the Wasp video - CNET
Marvel Cinematic Universe movie No. 20 is out right now. Here's what's awesome about it and what's less than marvelous.
WIRED
74 d ago
Why 'Ant-Man and the Wasp''s Heroine Is a Crystal Ball for Marvel
Hope Van Dyne is an indication of what Marvel's superheroines will look like in the future.
CNET News
46 d ago
Ant-Man and the Wasp post-credits scenes, explained - CNET
One's a doozy. The other? Eh... Spoilers ahead!
Polygon
73 d ago
Ant-Man and The Wasp’s after-credits scene leaves us with many questions
Small actions come with big consequences
Continue reading…
Mashable
73 d ago
Why superhero movies need to be more like 'Ant-Man'
We're in the peak era of superhero movies and superhero movie fatigue. 
Ant-Man and the Wasp is a welcome change of pace , just as Ant-Man was in 2015. Despite budget and scale, these movies work best with streamlined plots, astute characters, and a story that doesn't rely on superpowers and VFX.
SEE ALSO: Who's who in 'Ant-Man and the Wasp'
The reason Ant-Man was such a tight, successful film is because it wasn't a superhero movie so much as a heist. It belongs in the conversation with the Ocean's films as much as it does the Captain America series. 
Ant-Man and the Wasp is a family film – about nuclear families, grieving families, broken families, found families. It's about fighting for the safety of your family, which is as close as most of us will come to saving Earth from Thanos, and feels just as important. Read more...
More about Entertainment , Movies , Marvel , Ant Man , and Mcu
Business Insider
73 d ago
10 questions we have after seeing 'Ant-Man and the Wasp'
Warning: There are spoilers ahead for "Ant-Man and the Wasp."
" Ant-Man and the Wasp " is now in theaters and while everything appeared to wrap up nicely at the film's end, if you stayed through the credits you missed a very important scene that leaves a lot up in the air.
While the majority of "Ant-Man and the Wasp" is filled with laughs, there are probably a few lingering questions you have afterward. How is Scott going to get out of his current jam? Will we ever see Ghost again? And how was Janet Van Dyne's makeup so fresh after being trapped for in the Quantum Realm for 30 years?
Keep reading to see the biggest questions we have after "Ant-Man and the Wasp."
What happens if Scott Lang is sucked into the time vortex? Marvel
In the first end-credits scene for "Ant-Man and the Wasp," Janet Van Dyne warns Lang to avoid slipping into a time vortex because they won't be able to save him. If he did, what would happen? Would he travel backward or forward in time? Or would he be lost to time forever? Maybe Lang will have no choice but to find out if he wants to escape the Quantum Realm.

How will Scott Lang get out of the Quantum Realm? Marvel
No one is around on that roof to help Scott Lang return back from the Quantum Realm and no one else probably knows he's there. We're hoping Lang has an emergency Pym particle disk to make him larger to escape like he did in the first "Ant-Man" movie. 
Otherwise, we're betting once Tony Stark makes it back to Earth (he has to, right?) that he'll have a way to track Lang. You can read more on how Lang will most likely escape the Quantum Realm here .

Is Ghost permanently cured or did Janet give her a temporary fix? Marvel
At the end of "Ant-Man and the Wasp" Michelle Pfeiffer's Janet Van Dyne appears to heal Ava by using Quantum energy from her fingertips and transferring it. 
But if you were paying close attention to the movie's first end-credit scene, it appears Ava isn't out of the woods yet. Scott Lang heads back into the Quantum Realm to gather particles. He says they're healing particles for their new ghost friend. Does Ava need treatments in order to stay in one reality?

See the rest of the story at Business Insider
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Fox News
73 d ago
Michael Douglas says 'Ant Man & Wasp' is a feel-good blessing in 'divisive' times
The two-time Academy Award-winner wants people to break away from their daily practices and distract themselves from the world, even if it's just for a few hours.
Gawker Media
73 d ago
Ant-Man and the Wasp's Generational Superhero Story Adds a New Layer to the MCU
Goofy humor, a smaller scope, father-daughter relationships—there are lots of things that set Ant-Man apart from the other franchises in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. In Ant-Man and the Wasp, though, director Peyton Reed wanted to add at least one more thing to the list.
Read more...
Business Insider
71 d ago
If you've seen 'Ant-Man and the Wasp,' we need to talk about Hawkeye
Marvel
Warning: There are some spoilers ahead for "Ant-Man and the Wasp."
If you went into "Ant-Man and the Wasp" hoping to get some answers about the location of Hawkeye, you may leave at the end of the movie disappointed. See the rest of the story at Business Insider
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See Also:
Fans have a theory that Thanos time traveled at the end of 'Avengers: Infinity War' 10 questions we have after seeing 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' has 2 end-credit scenes — here’s what they mean for future Marvel movies
GameSpot
73 d ago
12 Movies About Growing And Shrinking, Just Like Ant-Man And The Wasp

Ant-Man and The Wasp is now in theaters, and while it is a Marvel superhero film, the movie is filled with moments of people and things growing to immense sizes and shrinking to the size of bugs. However, it's not the only movie featuring this sci-fi trope, which feels very at home during the 1950's science fiction craze. And while this theme isn't new at all, it is predominantly featured in quite a few films over the past 60 years.
From Disney's Alice shrinking in order to get into inside a door to Wayne Szalinski ruining his life by using his shrinking/growing machine, there are actually some solid movies about this concept--as well as a few mediocre ones. So we decided to take a quick look at some other movies featuring people growing and shrinking in size for you to check out before or after you see Ant-Man and The Wasp.
In our review of Ant-Man and the Wasp, GameSpot's Mike Rougeau said, "Ant-Man and the Wasp is hilarious, fun, silly, self aware, and creative. Filled with pseudo-science gobbledigook, crazy action, and multiple villains all vying for screen time, it's one of the most comic-booky MCU movies yet. The fates of all our favorite heroes after Avengers: Infinity War may still be up in the air, but in the meantime, Ant-Man and the Wasp is a welcome distraction."
For more on Ant-Man and The Wasp, learn about the mid and post-credit scenes , the history of the character in the comics, and why the movie is set before Infinity War . Otherwise, check out these other movies about getting large or going small.

Alice In Wonderland (1951)
In this classic Disney film, Alice follows a white rabbit into the forest, which leads her down a rabbit hole. From there, she shrinks in size after drinking a magic potion, then grows after eating a biscuit. While the focus of the movie isn't about growing and shrinking, it's one of the most iconic moments of the movie.

The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957)
After exposure to radiation and insecticides, while enjoying a day in the sun, Scott Carey begins to shrink. He goes from a normal-sized man, to a few inches shorter, to being small enough to live in a dollhouse. Carey finds animals like a house cat and spiders become life-threatening when you're only six inches tall.

Attack Of The 50 Foot Woman (1958)
Rich socialite Nancy Archer isn't having the best life because her husband has been having an affair but continues to come crawling back when he needs money. One evening, Archer has an encounter with a UFO which transformers her to 50 feet tall. She then decides to take vengeance on her horrid husband.

Fantastic Voyage (1966)
Both the United States and the Soviet Union have created technology that can shrink people and objects; however, it only lasts for an hour. Dr. Jan Benes finds a way to make the shrinking last indefinitely, but finds himself in a coma after an assassination attempt. A group of doctors board a submarine, become miniaturized, and go inside Dr. Benes in order to save his life by removing a brain clot.

Honey, I Shrunk The Kids (1987)
Wayne Szalinski, the crazy scientist next door, creates a machine that can shrink things. However, his son, daughter, and two of his neighbor's kids end up and the wrong place at the wrong time and end up shrinking so small that ants are the size a horse and blades of grass are now the size of a tree. The kids go on a mission in their own backyard to try and get big again.

Innerspace (1987)
A pilot named Tuck is involved in a miniaturization experiment. He gets shrunk inside a vehicle and placed inside a syringe, but a group of bad dudes steal the technology, and Tuck gets injected inside Jack Putter, a store clerk. Tuck finds a way to communicate with Jack, while inside of him, and the two try to find a way to get the shrinking technology back and restore Tuck to regular size.

Big (1988)
A teenage boy named Josh wants nothing more than to be older, and one night, he makes a wish on a Zoltar machine to be big. He wakes up the next morning a full-grown adult. His best friend Billy helps Josh acclimate to the adult world while the two search for the Zoltar machine to reverse the wish.

Honey, I Blew Up The Kid (1992)
This time around, Wayne Szalinski makes a machine that can make things big, and just like the first movie, his technology goes awry when he accidentally uses it on his toddler, who begins growing at an incredible rate, up to 100 feet tall. Szalinski, once again, has to figure out a way to fix his kid.

Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves (1997)
At this point, Wayne Szalinski should be in prison for child endangerment and probably a bunch of other crimes. This time around, Wayne shrinks himself, his wife, his brother, and his brother's wife. Now, Wayne needs to get his children's attention in order to fix wet another problem he created.

Ant-Man (2015)
Scott Lang is trying to get his life back on track after being released from prison. However, he finds himself in rough spot when he steals a suit that allows him to shrink in size, and the suit's creator wants him to pull off a major heist to keep the shrinking technology out of the wrong hands.

Downsizing (2017)
Paul, an occupational therapist, decides to change his life forever by taking part in a procedure that shrinks humans to a few inches tall. However, his wife doesn't come with him, and Paul learns to live his life on his own, in a world that's so much larger than it used to be.

Rampage (2018)
Very loosely based on the arcade game of the same name, Rampage follows Davis Okoye, a primatologist who finds the albino gorilla--George--he takes care of is growing in size because of a genetic experiment gone wrong. Okoye teams with George to take on two other giant, mutated animals who are destroying Chicago.

The Daily Beast
73 d ago
Marvel’s ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ and Hollywood’s Misunderstanding of Disability
Marvel Studios
With widespread discussions about who gets to tell stories about marginalized communities, it remains rare to see characters with disabilities in mass-market media. Marvel’s latest, Ant-Man and the Wasp, could have been incredibly forward-thinking with its introduction of Ava, played by Hannah John-Kamen, a woman of color dealing with chronic pain. Unfortunately, short-sighted filmmakers hamper this depiction which could have furthered the conversation on race and disability with ableistic tropes, including the desire for a miraculous cure.
John-Kamen plays Ava in Ant-Man and the Wasp, a woman whose condition is due to the effects of quantum forces which leave her cells unstable and constantly “phasing” between dimensions. Desperate to make her pain stop, she turns to attacking scientist Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) and his daughter, Hope van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly), with the intent of stealing Hank’s technology and extracting enough energy from Hank’s wife, Janet (Michelle Pfeiffer) to save herself.
Read more at The Daily Beast.
Mashable
73 d ago
Ant-Man is the only Marvel hero who would be a good friend
The Marvel heroes, Avengers and otherwise, are an unstoppable charismatic force because there is everything to love about a bunch of hot people with superpowers kicking the snot out of CGI aliens and quipping cleverly in punchy asides. It’s part of the appeal of Marvel heroes that we want to hang out with them.
But to be honest... that might actually kind of suck.
SEE ALSO: 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' review roundup: Low-stakes fun
Dr. Strange is a dick. Black Panther and Iron Man are busy being rich. Captain America is a thick slice of trauma cake served with a side of “all my friends are dead” and War Machine tells the same stories over and over at parties.  Read more...
More about Paul Rudd , Ant Man , Ant Man And The Wasp , Entertainment , and Movies Tv Shows
Gawker Media
72 d ago
Ant-Man and the Wasp's Director Dissects One of the Movie's Huge Fights
Making a fight scene for a big superhero movie is complicated. Making a fight scene where the heroes are constantly shrinking and growing is even more complicated.
Read more...
USA Today
73 d ago
Spoilers! How 'Ant-Man and the Wasp's end-credits scenes set up 'Avengers 4'
'Avengers: Infinity War' put half its superhero cast in jeopardy, and not to be outdone, 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' also has a cliffhanger going into Marvel's 'Avengers 4.'
         
 
 
Polygon
72 d ago
Ant-Man and the Wasp’s director on half-size Paul Rudd & Morrissey references
With a million possibilities and a team of special-effects artists at his disposal, Peyton Reed’s sequel is full of surprising choices
Continue reading…
TechCrunch
72 d ago
‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ director Peyton Reed on following ‘Infinity War’
If you watch Ant-Man and the Wasp hoping for clues to the aftermath of Avengers: Infinity War , you’ll probably be disappointed: Although the just-released film is coming out a few months after Infinity War, Ant-Man and the Wasp actually takes place earlier, and it’s focused almost entirely on the personal struggles of its heroes.
In fact, after Infinity War, there was at least one article wondering, “ How the hell are we supposed to care about Ant-Man and the Wasp now? ” In other words, after you’ve watched armies of Marvel heroes battling for the fate of the universe, how can you care about an adventure that takes place earlier, with a mere two superheroes?
Peyton Reed, director of both Ant-Man films, told me he wasn’t worried about the stakes feeling too low. There’s some precendent, after all, with Ant-Man‘s release a few months after Avengers: Age of Ultron.
“That really is part of the Ant-Man movies — the stakes are really high … they’re just personal stakes,” Reed said. “You know it’s not a gigantic, genocidal villain like Infinity War. On that level, we don’t want to top Thanos.”
Instead, Reed said these films have “very different storytelling ambitions,” and in fact, his hope is that they have “the most personal tone” of the Marvel films.
At the same time, this is a sequel, and the 20th (!) film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Asked how he approaches the audience when he’s this deep into a mega-franchise, Reed said, “I really just use myself as the moviegoer, as a litmus test in terms of what they have and haven’t seen. [At] Marvel, no one wants to repeat themselves, no one wants to bore an audience.”
One of the big changes from the first Ant-Man is right there in the title: Hope van Dyne (played by Evangeline Lilly) is no longer just assisting her father Hank Pym (Michael Douglas). Instead, she’s putting on her own costume, fighting crime and searching for her long-lost mother Janet (Michelle Pfeiffer). In many ways, Hope proves to be a more competent superhero than Scott Lang (Paul Rudd), who took on the mantle of Ant-Man in the previous film.
Rather remarkably, this is the first time a female superhero has made it into the title of a Marvel Cinematic Universe film (Marvel characters like Black Widow and Gamora have thus far been limited to team movies, or appeared as supporting characters in someone else’s story). Reed said even while he was developing Ant-Man, there was already a plan to have Hope step up in the second film — thanks to the comics, he’d always thought of the characters as a duo.
“It also felt like the organic way to forward these characters from the first movie,” he said. “We knew Hope van Dyne was very capable, but was being held back from that by her issues with her father. Now that the issues between them are resolved, we can create a really fully-formed hero.”
The sequel also provided more of an opportunity to explore the sub-microscopic “quantum realm” introduced in Ant-Man. The setting may feel pretty out-there, but Reed said he worked with the film’s technical consultant Spyridon Michalakis (a quantum physicist at Caltech) to try to get the science right.
“We don’t want to give the audience a headache — but 20, 30, 50 years from now, we don’t want people to say, ‘Oh man, that was way off, that has no bearing on reality,'” Reed said.
As an example, he pointed to the film’s treatment of quantum entanglement as a way to incorporate a real scientific concept while introducing it in a way that’s funny and character-driven.
Ant-Man and the Wasp also takes better advantage of real San Francisco locations like Lombard Street — Reed noted that while the first film took place in SF, much of the action was limited to Hank Pym’s house. This time around, he wanted to “open up and be in actual San Francisco,” which created its own challenges, particularly since the new movie is also playing with Scott’s ability to both shrink and increase his size.
“Shooting in daylight, exterior San Francisco, you had to believe that Giant Man was really there,” Reed said. “That was probably the biggest overall challenge — we’d done a shrinking movie already, so we played with variable size while trying to keep it photo realistic.”
While Reed’s found new success with superheroes, I also wondered if he ever worries that Marvel and Marvel-style blockbusters are crowding out the studio comedies that he made his name with, like Bring It On and Down With Love. Reed countered that this was an issue “long before the Marvel Cinematic Universe,” with studios either wanting to make “low, low budget movies” or giant blockbusters.
“I don’t think it any tougher now,” he said. “Honestly, in some ways it’s a bit easier, because not only studios but people like Netflix are financing comedies and stuff like that. I guess what I’m saying is: It’s always been tough.”
Gawker Media
72 d ago
Hannah John-Kamen Got a Pretty Nice Recommendation for Ant-Man and The Wasp
Hannah John-Kamen, who plays Ghost in the film, got a fairly prestigious recommendation on her way to landing the part.
Read more...
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