Hypegram : The 50 best TV shows of 2018: No 5 – Succession ARTICLE 176830093 The 50 best TV shows of 2018: No 5 – Succession english ARTICLE

The year’s guiltiest pleasure was an engrossing prestige TV melodrama that cannily critiqued end-times capitalism

A scene in the first episode of neatly encapsulates the destructive callousness of its central billionaire dynasty, the Roys. During the family’s annual softball game, youngest son Roman Roy – played with terrific smarm and snark by – invites the child of a Latino groundskeeper to play. Hit a home run, he tells the boy, and he will give him a million dollars. He even signs a cheque there and then to prove it. It could be a gesture of benevolence from a member of the super-rich to people tasked with cleaning up after them, but things don’t play out that way: the Roys callously run the boy out at third base and Roman rips the cheque up in front of him. Later, a Roy employee gets the Latino family to sign a non-disclosure agreement, another underling quietly tidying up their mess.

When Succession debuted last spring, some critics wondered whether anyone would want to watch a fictional representation of an extremely wealthy, predominately male family behaving monstrously when there were so many real-life examples to observe instead. Others asked if it the show’s display of gilded awfulness was really what we needed now. It soon became clear that what we needed and what we wanted were very different things, and quickly became the year’s guiltiest pleasure on the small screen, an engrossing prestige TV melodrama of squabbling and secrecy that doubled as a canny critique of bloated end-times capitalism – and one of the year’s funniest show to boot. (Also, the theme tune is ).

https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2018/dec/14/the-50-best-tv-shows-of-2018-no-5-succession /itemImage/176830093 Fri Dec 14 2018 06:00:38 GMT+0000 (UTC) television & radiohboculturemediatelevision industryus television industrysoap operadramatelevision {}

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The 50 best TV shows of 2018: No 5 – Succession


The Guardian
35 d ago

television & radio hbo culture media television industry us television industry soap opera drama television

The year’s guiltiest pleasure was an engrossing prestige TV melodrama that cannily critiqued end-times capitalism

A scene in the first episode of neatly encapsulates the destructive callousness of its central billionaire dynasty, the Roys. During the family’s annual softball game, youngest son Roman Roy – played with terrific smarm and snark by – invites the child of a Latino groundskeeper to play. Hit a home run, he tells the boy, and he will give him a million dollars. He even signs a cheque there and then to prove it. It could be a gesture of benevolence from a member of the super-rich to people tasked with cleaning up after them, but things don’t play out that way: the Roys callously run the boy out at third base and Roman rips the cheque up in front of him. Later, a Roy employee gets the Latino family to sign a non-disclosure agreement, another underling quietly tidying up their mess.

When Succession debuted last spring, some critics wondered whether anyone would want to watch a fictional representation of an extremely wealthy, predominately male family behaving monstrously when there were so many real-life examples to observe instead. Others asked if it the show’s display of gilded awfulness was really what we needed now. It soon became clear that what we needed and what we wanted were very different things, and quickly became the year’s guiltiest pleasure on the small screen, an engrossing prestige TV melodrama of squabbling and secrecy that doubled as a canny critique of bloated end-times capitalism – and one of the year’s funniest show to boot. (Also, the theme tune is ).

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