Hypegram : 2018's best (and worst) new luxury hotels ARTICLE 179156941 2018's best (and worst) new luxury hotels english ARTICLE tech For the ultimate in modern luxury, head to the Maldives, say the experts at Luxury Travel Intelligence. https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/best-worst-luxury-hotels-2018/index.html /itemImage/179156941 Fri Dec 21 2018 13:39:05 GMT+0000 (UTC) {}

Hypegram.com is a bot that analyses online news websites with deep learning algorithms to help you discover hotnews, breakingnews and the latest up to the minute news stories updates.

Hypegram.com is an artificial intelligence bot that groups news together to detect newsworthy subjects from a wide range of news sources.

Join in the conversation today! find out what's happening worldwide summarised using one of the smartest algorithms in content curation through language processing.

Back to Index Back to Index
*Biggest Headlines | Business & Politics | Sports | Science & Tech | Design & Arts | Gadgets & Gaming | Movies & Showbiz | Fashion & Lifestyle
feedback / report bug

2018's best (and worst) new luxury hotels


CNN
28 d ago


For the ultimate in modern luxury, head to the Maldives, say the experts at Luxury Travel Intelligence.
View Full Article On CNN

advertisement

Similar Articles From the Last Few Days

Gawker Media
30 d ago
The 10 Best (and 5 Worst) Films of 2018
Way back at the beginning of 2018, you kind of had feeling it was going to be a good year at the movies. Two weeks in, we had a contender in the form of Paddington 2. February brought the $700 million hit Black Panther and the hypnotic Annihilation. And even before that, film festivals introduced us to Hereditary,…
Read more...
CNET News
30 d ago
Apple's year in review: The best and worst of 2018 video - CNET
A look back at Apple's biggest wins of the year along with some of its most memorable flops.
advertisement
New York Times
29 d ago
Best (and Worst) Theater in Europe in 2018
Our three European theater critics pick their favorite productions of the year — plus a turkey for the festive season.
TechCrunch
28 d ago
The best and worst gadgets of 2018
There were countless gadgets released in 2018. It’s the end of the year, so Brian and I rounded up the best of the best and the worst of the worst.
Some where great! Like the Oculus Go. Or the Google Home Hub. But some were junk, like the revived Palm or PlayStation Classic.
CES 2019 is a few weeks away, where manufacturers will roll out most of their wares for the upcoming year. But most products will not be available for purchase for months. What follows is a list of the best and worst gadgets available going into 2019.
The Best Google Home Hub
Google took its sweet time bringing an Echo Show competitor to market. When the Home Hub did finally arrive, however, the company lapped the competition. The smart screen splits the size difference between the Echo Spot and Show, with a form factor that fits in much more comfortably in most home decor.
Assistant still sports a much deeper knowledge base than Alexa, and the Hub offers one not so secret weapon: YouTube. Google’s video service is light years ahead of anything Amazon (or anyone, really) currently offers, and the competition shows no sign of catching up.
DJI Osmo Pocket
I wanted to dislike the Osmo Pocket. I mean, $349 for a gimbal with a built-in screen is pretty steep by any measure — especially given the fact that the drone maker has much cheaper and more professional options. After an afternoon with the Pocket, however, I was hooked.
The software takes a little getting used to, but once you’ve mastered it, you’re off to the races, using many of the same tricks you’ll find on the Mavic line. Time-lapse, FaceTrack and the 10 Story Mode templates are all impressive and can help novices capture compelling video from even the most mundane subject matter.
Oculus Go
The most recent wave of VR headsets has been split between two distinct categories. There are the high-end Rift and Vives on one side and the super-low-cost Daydreams and Gear VRs on the other. That leaves consumers in the unenviable position of choosing between emptying the bank account or opting for a sub-par experience.
Oculus’ Go headset arrived this year to split the difference. In a time when virtual reality seems at the tail end of its hype cycle, the $199 device offers the most compelling case for mainstreaming yet.
It’s a solid and financially accessible take on VR that shows that the category may still have a little life left in it yet.
Timbuk2 Never Check Expandable Backpack
Granted, it’s not a gadget per se, but the Never Check is the best backpack I’ve ever owned. I initially picked it up as part of a Gift Guide feature I was writing, and I’ve since totally fallen for the thing.
As someone who spends nearly half of his time on the road these days, the bag’s big volume and surprisingly slim profile have been a life saver. It’s followed me to a Hong Kong hostel and a Nigerian hotel, jammed full of all the tech I need to do my job.
It’s also unassuming enough to be your day to day bag. Just zip up one of those waterproof zippers to compress its footprint.
Happy Hacking Keyboard Professional 2
Like most nerds, I have more keyboards than friends. In 2018 I gave mechanical keyboards a chance. Now, at the end of the year, I’m typing on a Happy Hacking Keyboard Professional 2. It’s lovely.
This keyboard features Topre capacitive 45G switches. What does that mean? When typing, these switches provide a nice balance of smooth action and tactile feel. There are a handful of mechanical switches available, and after trying most of them, this switch feels the best to me. The Topre capacitive switch is available in a handful of keyboards, but I like the Happy Hacking Keyboard the best.
The HHK has been around in various forms since 1996, and this latest version retains a lot of the charm, including dip switches. Everyone loves dip switches. This version works well with Macs, has two USB ports and is compact enough someone could throw it into a bag. Starting just last month, the keyboard is available in the U.S. through Fujitsu, so buyers don’t have to deal with potentially shady importers.
The Worst Palm
The Palm is the kind of device you really want to like. And I tried. Hell, I took the thing to Africa with me in hopes that I’d be able to give it some second life as an MP3 player. But it fell short even on that front.
This secondary smartphone is a device in search of a problem, appealing to an impossibly thin slice of consumer demographics. It’s definitely adorable, but the ideal consumer has to have the need and money for a second display, no smartwatch and an existing Verizon contract. Even then, the product has some glaring flaws, from more complex user issues to simple stupid things, like a lack of volume buttons.
It’s easy to forgive a lot with a fairly well-designed first-generation product, but it’s hard to see where the newly reborn company goes from here. Palm, meet face.
Red Hydrogen One
Where to start? How about the price? Red’s first foray into the smartphone space starts at $1,293 (or $1,595 if you want to upgrade your aluminum to titanium). That price will get you a middling phone with an admittedly fascinating gimmick.
After what seemed like years of teasers, the Hydrogen One finally appeared in October, sporting a big, metal design and Rambo-style serrated edges. The display’s the thing here, sporting a “nano-photonic” design that looks a bit like a moving version of those holographic baseball cards we had as kids.
I showed it to a number of folks during my testing period, and all found it initially interesting, then invariably asked “why?” I’m still having trouble coming up with the answer on that one. Oh, and a few told me they became a touch nauseous looking at it. Can’t win ’em all, I guess.
Facebook Portal
“Why?” is really the overarching question in all of these worst devices. It’s not as if the Portal was a bad product. The design of the thing is actually pretty solid — certainly it looks a lot nicer than the Echo Show. And while it was initially lacking in features, Facebook has made up for that a bit with a recent software update.
The heart of the question is more about what Portal brings to the table that the Echo Show or Google Home Hub don’t. It would have to be something pretty massive to justify bringing a Facebook-branded piece of hardware into one’s living room, especially in light of all of the privacy concerns the social media site has dealt with this year. There’s never been a great time for Facebook to launch a product like this, but somehow, now feels like the worst.
Portal delivers some neat tricks, including impressive camera tracking and AR stories, but it mostly feels like a tone-deaf PR nightmare.
PlayStation Classic
1: Half the games are PAL ports and do not run well on U.S. TVs
2: Missing classics like Gran Turismo, Crash Bandicoot and Tomb Raider
3: Doesn’t include a power adapter
4: Only one suspend point
5: This product makes me angry
 
advertisement
New York Times
28 d ago
‘Hellboy’ and the Week’s Best (and Worst) Trailers
The “Men in Black: International” clip is also intriguing, but “Where’d You Go, Bernadette?” seems aimed solely at the novel’s fans.
Gawker Media
28 d ago
The Best and Worst Comics Moments of 2018
One of the upsides to 2018 feeling like a year that was never going to end was that it seemed as if there was an eternity to read comics instead of, say, giving into the existential dread lurking within you. With that in mind, let’s look back at some of the best and worst comics moments that pushed us forward and…
Read more...
advertisement
CNN
28 d ago
The best of times or the worst of times?
Steve Pinker and Niall Ferguson join Fareed to debate whether the world is at its safest and most prosperous, or as frightening and vulnerable as ever.
© 2016 Hypegram, All Rights Reserved