ARTICLE 80092424 The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild review english ARTICLE

With , one of the longest-running, most beloved video game franchises of all time feels like it’s finally moving forward.

It’s debatable whether or not Zelda as a series has been in a rut, and for how long, but it’s almost...

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The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild review


Polygon
231 d ago

gaming

With , one of the longest-running, most beloved video game franchises of all time feels like it’s finally moving forward.

It’s debatable whether or not Zelda as a series has been in a rut, and for how long, but it’s almost...

View Full Article On Polygon

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232 d ago
The Breath of the Wild team created a 2D Zelda prototype to test mechanics
The team used a 2D The Legend of Zelda to test ideas
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Venture Beat
232 d ago
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild’s first prototype looked like an NES game
What’s old is new (and in this case, also went from green to blue).
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild game director Hidemaro Fujibayashi, technical director Takuhiro Dohta, and art director Satoru Takizawa talked today at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco about the anticipated open-world game, which comes out on March 3 for the Switch (as a launch game for the new console) and Wii U. It’s one of Nintendo’s most important games in a long time, as it represents an attempt to create a large, freeing world that gives players room to explore and experiment. It’s also the biggest game launching with the Switch.
During the talk, the designers showed off the first prototype for the game, which actually looked a lot like the original The Legend of Zelda, which came out for the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1986. You can see it above.
For comparison, here is what the original The Legend of Zelda looked like.
Above: Sprites!
Image Credit: Emu Paradise
So, what could Nintendo learn from such a simple test? While it looks 2D, Nintendo actually created the project in a 3D environment that enabled them to test some of the physics and gameplay designs it was planning. This included things like how fire would interact with objects, or how Link could interact with his environment by cutting down a tree and then moving a log
Above: Moving logs in the alpha.
Image Credit: GamesBeat
Which looks like this in the final game:
Above: Moving logs in the actual game.
Image Credit: GamesBeat
Neat! That’s a fun way to test a game early in development.
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Speaking at a GDC 2017 panel, Change and Constant — Breaking Conventions with The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, game director Hidemaro Fujibayashi showed that in order to test gameplay ideas and philosophy for the upcoming Zelda game, a 2D prototype was created in the style of the original NES The Legend of Zelda.
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The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is the next installment in Nintendo’s over 30-year-old fantasy series. It comes out March 3 for the Switch (as the console’s flagship launch game) and the Wii U. It’s an open world focusing on exploration and player creativity. Breath of the Wild also features a striking art style filled with vibrant colors, looking more like an animated movie than the attempts to capture realism that we see from other studios.
For Zelda fans, Breath of the Wild reminds you of The Wind Waker. That’s the 2003 entry in the series that came out for the GameCube. It stood out for its cartoon-like graphics, which look like this:
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This lead to the creation of Wind Waker HD for the Wii U. When working on this enhanced version of the GameCube game, Nintendo was also in the early stages of project that would become Breath of the Wild. The team realized that Wind Waker’s art could serve as the inspiration for the new game.
Above: That’s a lovely blouse.
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But Nintendo did not want to just copy Wind Waker. It still felt that its art had some flaws. It was too cartoony to convey necessary information. Some characters and objects would be so stylized that some players couldn’t recognize them. It also gave the game a “childish” look that could throw some older players off.
So Nintendo compromised and came up with Breath of the Wild’s art style, one that features bright colors but also more realistic proportions and detailing. But it did not strive for total realism, which let the developers do fun things like have food dance in a pot while it cooks without it looking completely ridiculous or out-of-place.
So, long after its 2003 release and even with its HD remaster a few years old, Wind Waker still has a big impact on the franchise.
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232 d ago
Zelda: Breath of the Wild’s creators prototyped with the original NES classic
Sometimes creators need to go back to their roots to find inspiration for their latest games. They’ll look at what went right, what went wrong and what inspired them. 
The same is true for Takuhiro Dohta, Hidemaro Fujibayashi and Satoru Takizawa, three of the lead designers on The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. But instead of simply returning to the series’ roots to find out what worked, the team created an updated version of the NES classic as a prototype for their new game, Breath of the Wild.  
The team showed off its creation at a panel during GDC 2017 entitled "Change and Constant: Breaking Conventions with The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild." 
Fujibayashi, along with the rest of the team, felt that the game needed to balance the open nature of the original but incorporate new mechanics that “stirred the soul” of gamers. 
And there was no better place to build and test these mechanics than the original world built 30 years ago. 
 Some old, some new 
 One of those aforementioned mechanics was a chemistry system in which elements (water, fire, wind, electricity) impacted objects in the game world.   
In a short video, Fujibayashi demonstrated how the creators first shot an arrow through a camp fire in the prototype to demonstrate how it lit a tree on fire to see what it would feel like before importing the mechanic to Breath of the Wild.  
Fujibayashi showed off several examples of how the prototype the team made helped mold and shape Breath of the Wild including everything from item collection to how the map should be built to allow players to go wherever they want without invisible boundaries limiting them.   
Sadly, while you won’t be able to play Fujibayashi’s NES-style prototype of Breath of the Wild, you will be able to play the full game – including HD graphics and, you know, three full dimensions – when it comes out Friday, March 3 on the Nintendo Switch .  
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"When we were developing the game for the Wii U, we had touch features implemented as you have seen," Zelda: Breath of the Wild director Hidemaro Fujibayashi told IGN. "Once we began to develop the game in tandem for the Switch, we aimed to provide the same gameplay experience across both on Switch and Wii U."
Fujibayashi was referring to a demo from The Game Awards 2014, where Zelda creator Shigeru Miyamoto and series producer Eiji Aonuma played an early build of the game with touch controls displayed on the Wii U GamePad.
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Venture Beat
231 d ago
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild will make you 11 years old again
PREVIEW:
The boy who handed me a random Game Boy cartridge wasn’t my friend. He also wasn’t a bully. He was more like the official class troublemaker, and so I should’ve stopped and asked him why he was giving me The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening. It wasn’t my birthday. It wasn’t some special class gift-exchange day. He had no good reason to do so.
But I was 11 years old. I wasn’t going to say no to a free game.
It took me a decade, but I finally pieced together that the boy had stolen the game out of the class assistant’s purse. She was the nicest lady, and I remember her liking me a lot. We even bonded over our love of the game when she saw me playing it once. She told me that she had to buy it again because her copy went missing. I don’t know if she ever suspected that I stole it. I hope not, and I wish I could find her now to tell her that I’m sorry that I didn’t realize what had happened sooner.
And yet, I’m glad that boy committed his tiny act of larceny and made me an accomplice, because Link’s Awakening is my favorite game. Figuring out that I was supposed to use the Power Bracelet to pick up the dungeon boss and hurl him against the wall to break his bottle was a long process for my child brain to tackle, but when that finally clicked after months of trying to figure it out, it was a powerful moment that unlocked my understanding of the series and video games as a medium.
It gives me a pang of anxiety to imagine a world where that boy didn’t try to pass the game off on me, because I don’t think I’d be the same person that I am today without it.
And then there’s The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, which is a masterpiece.
Above: Yes, Sidon is hot.
Image Credit: GamesBeat/Jeffrey Grubb
I have no reservations about making that claim. Its size is astounding, especially because every mountain peak, tree grove, and river valley has something special for you to discover. Its openness will shock you, because it doesn’t rely on artificial limitations to keep you inside of any predetermined safe space. Its story and characters are unforgettable, which is more impressive because they are now competing against emergent stories that you’ll come up with on your own.
But for me, the most powerful aspect of this new Zelda is the way its mechanics and systems create that sensation I got when I fought the second boss in Link’s Awakening. It is the first adventure game since that Game Boy Zelda to make me feel that overwhelming sense of revelation. And it isn’t a singular instance — it’s so organic that it is a series of moments where you try something, it works, and your brain clicks into place and races with new possibilities.
To start from the beginning, Breath of the Wild is the latest entry in the Zelda franchise. It has Link once again taking on the forces of evil led by Ganon, the series’ classic bad guy. Only this time, Nintendo has thrown out its well-worn, linear formula of gated areas that are only accessible after you get through certain dungeons and collect certain power-ups. In their place, the publisher has built a living, breathing world of interacting systems and mechanics that you are free to explore however you choose. Your only limitations are the number of hits you can take and the amount of stamina you have for swimming, climbing, sprinting, and your capability to withstand environmental changes. But you can augment all of these from the first moment, and you can even walk straight to the last boss in the first hour.
While Breath of the Wild is a massive departure, it is also more reminiscent of the original Legend of Zelda for the Nintendo Entertainment System than any other game in the series. Franchise creator Shigeru Miyamoto said that he came up with the idea for Zelda when he was exploring caves in Japan as a child. The series got away from that, but it has snapped back to this idea in a major way.
And the result is the best game Nintendo has ever made.
What you’ll like
A world of experiences that are both deep and wide
It isn’t enough to call Breath of the Wild a “large” video game. We’ve had big video games for a long time now, and I don’t want to simply imply that this game has a lot of story or that it’ll take you a long time to finish. It’s so much more than that.
Breath of the Wild’s mass comes both from a huge variety of activities and from the depth of those activities. At any moment, you could spend your time searching for challenge dungeons or running side quests for other characters. You could tame a horse or cook up special meals and elixirs. You could chase down the amnesiac Link’s memories, or you can just start running in a direction to see what you randomly stumble across.
But the point is that you could also do just one of those things. For example, I spent hours cooking foods and mixing up elixirs. I’d search out various ingredients just to see if I could make a cake or spicy chicken, and the system is so intricate and dynamic that it really is like learning a real-world skill.
Breath of the Wild reminds me of that old IBM video Powers of 10. In that short film, the camera pulls out on a couple having a picnic in Chicago at a multiple of 10 every 10 seconds until we are looking in from the edge of the universe, but then the camera zooms all the way back in on the couple and starts dividing by a factor of 10 until we are looking at existence on a sub-molecular level. That’s how I feel about the scale of Zelda. Yes, it expands endlessly in all directions, but each of its parts is also brimming with content.
As someone who has played a lot of open-world games at this point, Breath of the Wild’s density often baffles me. Everyone knows the old gaming industry line: “You see that mountain in the background? You can walk to it.” That scale was enough to excite me for a long time, but Zelda does something unexpected with its scope: It fills it with unique and interesting things to do.
Imagine Minecraft’s endless worlds, but instead of finding another cave or a procedurally generated town on the other side of the hill, you find an undiscovered monster to fight, a clever physics puzzle in a challenge dungeon, or a hidden secret to uncover. That’s the best way I can explain it. Instead of a Minecraft world, where you stumble across something that ended up in that position because of an algorithmic accident, Nintendo designers deliberately planned experiences for you over each one of Hyrule’s hills.
And I really do mean that I’m baffled. In a traditional Zelda town or dungeon, which are tiny spaces compared to the openness of Breath of the Wild, you’d often find forking paths. And you’d end up finding a reward if you did the work to explore all of your options thoroughly. Somehow, Nintendo has maintained that key characteristic of the Zelda franchise despite its vast open spaces.
If you’re running from one objective to another and you spot an outcropping, a lake, or a peculiar mountain peak, you should go explore it. Nothing’s stopping you, and chances are high that you’ll end up finding some special moment that Nintendo planned.
Other open-world game developers are going to play this and feel embarrassed. Bethesda, Ubisoft, and others have had us believing for so long that this kind of tight design experience wasn’t possible in a huge open space. You could have a game that frees up the player to interact with the world and is expansive in scale, but it might feel sloppy or like it was built in a cookie-cutter fashion on an assembly line.
But Nintendo is smashing that myth with Zelda, and it is a breathtaking thing to experience.
Lovable and loving characters
Do you spend any time on social media sites like Tumblr or Twitter? Well, prepare yourself for a flood of memes, cosplay, and fan art based on the Breath of the Wild’s cast.
Link still doesn’t talk, yet he has more personality than ever before thanks in large part to his extensive wardrobe and the capability to take selfies with control stick-activated emotes. Zelda also feels like a more active participant in the game than ever before. She is still often a damsel in distress, but she’s also the unchallenged leader of the fight against Ganon.
But Breath of the Wild’s roster goes well beyond Link and Zelda. A cast of supporting characters includes the handsome, flexing Zora prince Sidon and an accordion-playing anthropomorphic bird, Rito. You’ll get to learn how the Zora princess Lady Mipha and Link have a strong bond that upsets an older generation of the fish people. Even some lowly characters, like a girl named Paya in Kakariko Village, stands out as a memorable person.
Each of these characters shines because of strong writing, beautiful art design, and expressive animation, but the game is also not afraid to let love exist in its world. In one cutscene, you learn a lot about Mipha’s feelings. She even asks Link to go out on a date, and I like that the game isn’t afraid to say that sometimes these characters have feelings that go beyond friendship. That makes uncovering their histories and their motivations more interesting and rewarding.
Above: Mipha and Link.
Image Credit: GamesBeat/Jeffrey
Incredible new dungeon structure that keeps a mean pace
Most Zeldas since the Super Nintendo have maintained a basic formula of navigating the main world to get to dungeons that contained the bulk of the action and puzzles. Breath of the Wild swerves away from that and instead focuses on offering more than a 100 smaller challenge dungeons. They are short bursts of gameplay and mechanics that often require you to learn a new concept similar to a level in something like Portal. You’re using a core set of magic spells that enable you manipulate magnetic objects, summon bombs, stop time for a target, and more in order to find clever solutions to brain teasers.
All of these challenges are fun and difficult, and they are hiding all over the world. And that means you’re never far from a quick hit of top-notch Nintendo level design. And since they are so short, you never get bogged down because you haven’t seen the sky in four hours. It keeps the pace of the game flowing, and that’s crucial because the overworld has so much stuff to do and so much space to explore.
Now, the game does still have traditional dungeons, but it has fewer of them, and they are more focused on core concepts than in past Zeldas. For example, a dungeon in the Zora domain has you primarily solving water puzzles with almost no combat. That’s different than the Zora dungeon in Ocarina of Time, which had you in combat, solving puzzles, and exploring the space.
Gorgeous art
This is the first Zelda that Nintendo built for high-definition televisions. And even though it’s on the underpowered hardware of the Switch and Wii U (I played the Switch version), Nintendo has delivered a stunning work of interactive visual art.
Breath of the Wild sits somewhere between Wind Waker and Ocarina of Time for its style, but it definitely leans closer to the latter. These living cartoons have striking, detailed faces that are bursting with character, and that is a big reason they are so memorable. But they also exist in a world that feels like it is breathing. Nintendo accomplishes that living quality by visually representing the various systems in a number of subtle ways. If you’re in a cold and fertile part of the world, you’ll see clouds of moisture rolling off the land. If you’re in desert, you’ll see the horizon shift and shimmer due to the heat. And no matter where you are, the land is always animated with blowing leaves, swaying grass, and animals going about their day.
Beyond the environmental effects, the design of areas like towns are also stunning. One particular village, a town that returns from previous games, establishes an entirely new identity that echoes a Japanese mountain community. Breath of the Wild’s many horse stables end up looking like Mongolian migrational communities. And by borrowing from these real-life counterparts, the game’s fantasy setting ends up feeling more convincing and intimately familiar than ever before.
Selfies, anime, and music
Above: Yeah, this dude looks like he drinks Mountain Dew.
Image Credit: GamesBeat/Jeffrey Grubb
But then Breath of the Wild has a million other elements and quirks to love.
There’s the camera mechanic that you can use to scan objects in the environment like in Metroid Prime, but you can also use it to take selfies. I also think the music, which only comes in at certain moments, is beautiful. And like the rest of the game, the composer isn’t afraid to take risks with more electronica and other genres beyond the standard orchestral score.
There’s also the obvious anime influences that make the game feel young and fresh compared to the previous Zeldas that felt more like fairy tales or mythology. The anime-ification of Zelda is the reason that characters like Sidon have funny signature poses, and I think it’s also why we get one of the most incredible quests in the game where Link has to go the extra mile to sneak into a town that is hostile toward men.
Other things I adore about Breath of the Wild include its sense of fashion. Link gets some outrageous armor options, and I found myself wearing certain sets just because I liked the way they look. For example, whenever it was time to climb a mountain, I would wear the bandana and the climbing pants/shoes (all of which give a buff to climbing), but then I would unequip Link’s shirt. This would lower my overall defense rating, but I just thought Link looked right as a shirtless extreme-sports bro.
And finally, I love how Nintendo incorporates the narrative into Breath of the Wild. It’s almost all done through one mechanic, and you have to purposefully seek it out. The cutscenes look great, they present a story with likeable characters doing amazing things, and they don’t really ever overstay their welcome.
What you won’t like
It’s influenced by anime
I don’t want to make a big deal out of this, but not everything is wonderful about the influences of anime on The Legend of Zelda, and it’s possible I’m even misattributing the blame. But I don’t like that Zelda and Mipha both sound so fragile when they speak. They come across as if everything is about to cause them to break down.
And then there are the multiple creepy dudes. At multiple points in the game, you’ll meet guys who admit that they are just staring at women or spying on them. In one instance, a man is trying to get into the Gerudo Town that is off limits to men, and he just stands outside of its gates and tries to say that he’s not spying. At that same entrance, another man is running back and forth in front of the village in an attempt to get women to notice that he’s wearing rare and expensive boots. He thinks that he can get their attention because he heard that they like shoes. When you first talk to him, he says, “Oh, it’s just a guy,” and then he complains that none of the women will talk to him. You even end up having to do a quest to help a creepy guy in one village hit on a girl while she is working. This dude sits around all day and says it’s his job to check out anyone who enters the town, but he slips up multiple times and says he’s checking out “beauties” instead of strangers.
Above: This dude sucks.
Image Credit: GamesBeat/Jeffrey Grubb
Now, the writing typically plays these guys as chumps, but it also portrays them as harmless and silly, but if I think about it at all, it makes me uncomfortable to turn a dude stalking a woman at her work into a game. In real life, that’s almost never harmless, and I don’t like that the game is trying to pass that off as normal.
For me, these kinds of characters and the fragility of the women characters is reminiscent of some anime, but even if I am wrong about that influence, I still have problems with these aspects of Zelda.
Underwhelming and inconsistent voice acting
Breath of the Wild is still mostly unvoiced. Like in previous games, you’re going to end up reading the bulk of your conversations with characters. But Nintendo did include a few cutscenes with voice actors, and I don’t love it. It’s not terrible, but the characters come across as flat. And even if it were great, Nintendo doesn’t get a pass for having a few lines of spoken dialogue. Other games with larger scripts, like Mass Effect, have voice acting for every line, and Breath of the Wild should as well.
The interface could be more streamlined
I love cooking, combat, and everything else in Zelda, but selecting items from the menu or switching gear is a pain. If I go from using my stealth armor into a combat scenario, I have to pause the action to bring up the menu, and I need to manually select the headwear, the shirt, and the pants. And when I’m cooking, I can’t bring up a quick menu to throw ingredients into the pan. I have to hit the Plus button to bring up my inventory, I have to hold the ingredients, and then I have to go back to and set everything in manually. And I often cook 20 or 30 things at a time, and it takes too long to do that process over and over.
Conclusion
Zelda’s problems are tiny, and they look even smaller next to the its gigantic accomplishments. Nintendo has made a special video game in Breath of the Wild. As the name suggests, it is a breathing wilderness that Nintendo brought to life by abandoning the structured, predictable Zelda formula. At the same time, it feels like the ultimate culmination of the ideas we encountered in the first Zelda in 1987. And I think the result of all of its interlocking systems is a game that wants to slam you with moments of epiphanies. For me, my experience with Link’s Awakening was about getting that one major flash of insight and then using that to understand the rest of the game and then the rest of the Zelda series. For Breath of the Wild, Nintendo made a game that could replicate that moment over and over.
In his presentation at the Game Developer’s Conference in San Francisco, Breath of the Wild technical director Takuhiro Dohta said, “We really want players to have these moments where they interact with the world and think, ‘Wow! I’m a genius!” And that was always the core of Zelda, Breath of the Wild found a way to build an entire game where those moments were no longer scripted and instead emerged naturally from the player interacting with the systems.
And while I don’t know if I ever felt like a genius while playing Breath of the Wild, I did feel like I was 11 years old and unlocking the magical secrets of Zelda all over again.
Score: 100/100
Nintendo provided a copy of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild to GamesBeat under embargo for the purposes of this review. It is out March 3 for $60.
 
 
 
TechRadar
231 d ago
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild review
Amid the predictable excitement of the Nintendo Switch launch and the tantalising prospect of getting to play a brand new Legend of Zelda outing on day one, it's easy to forget that Breath of the Wild was first announced for the Wii U way back in 2013. 
Since then the game has been delayed twice and has shed its Wii U exclusivity, becoming a vital asset in the Nintendo Switch 's small-but-formidable launch lineup. 
This prolonged production period may well have annoyed those Wii U owners who were holding out for an original Zelda adventure on their much-maligned console, but the upside for Switch players is that we have a launch release which has benefitted from the kind of development period few first-generation titles are lucky enough to receive; Breath of the Wild refreshingly lacks the rough edges which usually plague early software and instead delivers a polished and mature experience which is worth purchasing a Switch for alone.
A new direction for the series
Nintendo has always been quite forthright in pitching Breath of the Wild as a new dawn for a series which last year celebrated its 30th anniversary. While previous Zelda outings have arguably veered towards the worryingly formulaic and linear, the amount of freedom this new latest release affords the player is at times overwhelming; Hyrule is bigger, bolder and denser than ever before, with mountain ranges which appear to stretch on for miles, hidden secrets around every bend and plenty of wildlife – both friendly and hostile. 
The area in which you begin your quest feels intimidating in its size, but when you realise this is in fact just a fraction of what's on offer, the impact is staggering. The kingdom feels like it goes on forever in all directions, making this the meatiest Zelda yet by an almost embarrassing margin.
"Hyrule is bigger, bolder and denser than ever before"
Nintendo has matched this expansive environment with an equally diverse set of game mechanics and features. 
Gone are the days when you simply had to grab hearts to replenish Link's health; instead, you now have to consume fruit or – better still – cook tasty dishes using a wide range of ingredients. 
Some of these recipes not only restore your vitality but also offer time-limited status buffs such as increased speed, stealth and strength. 
The reach for realism continues with the stamina gauge which limits strenuous activities; running for too long causes Link to stop and catch his breath, while climbing and swimming are similarly demanding, but the consequences of running out of puff during either of these are often fatal. 
Despite this, Link feels like he's taken a few pages out of the Assassin's Creed rulebook; he will automatically climb any object in his path (wet surfaces are harder to scale) and is surprisingly agile when it comes to dashing across rooftops and other structures. 
He's by no means superhuman, however; sharp changes in temperature have a detrimental effect on his health. When traversing the chilly mountain peaks you are forced to seek ingredients to cook dishes which warm you temporarily, or source clothing which shields you from the biting cold.
It's dangerous to go alone
Combat in Breath of the Wild will feel a little more familiar to series veterans; we've got the traditional handy lock-on system which allows you to circle your opponent, as well as button presses and stick movements to trigger side-steps and evasive leaps – time these correctly and they open up opportunities to counter with a powerful flurry of strikes. 
Weapons in the game are destructible, which means they often break during the melee. This aspect is perhaps the only part of Breath of the Wild which feels like an unnecessarily jarring disconnect from the past; some weapons break much faster than they should, and even though the process of switching to another is relatively painless, it breaks the otherwise silky flow of combat. 
"Some weapons break much faster than they should, and it can break the otherwise silky flow of combat"
Thankfully there are more than enough arms to be find around Hyrule (quite literally – one weapon is an enemy's severed limb) and you have space in your inventory to carry a few spares at all times. 
You can also rely on a bow for ranged attacks, and it's possible to use the Switch's motion controls for aiming – a welcome nod to one of the few things the Wii U most definitely got right.
"Hey! Listen!"
While there's a surprisingly strong story at the heart of Breath of the Wild – it wouldn't be a Zelda game if there wasn't – the temptation to explore is ever-present and Nintendo feeds this desire with a host of optional side-quests, interesting characters and bonus items placed off the beaten track. 
You can quick-travel between key locations as well as tame horses for faster movement, but it's often more enjoyable to take the scenic route from A to B, soaking up the stunning vistas and collecting items which can either be used for cooking, crafting or simply bartering as-is at the next settlement. 
To fully expose portions of the map you'll need to locate special towers and activate them – another example of Nintendo borrowing from the Assassin's Creed series, but one which works well and gives your exploratory thrusts into new areas a sense of purpose.
Dated graphics, great art-style
Given its status as a Wii U title upgraded to Switch launch release, it's perhaps forgivable to have some reservations about how Breath of the Wild looks – especially when it's entering an open-world genre which can boast such graphical masterpieces as The Witcher 3 and Horizon: Zero Dawn . As you can see from the screenshots, Breath of the Wild looks utterly fantastic; granted, it lacks the incredible level of detail seen in the latest PlayStation 4 and Xbox One titles, but the cel-shaded art style really shines and the draw-distance is remarkable. 
The game maintains a steady 30fps throughout, although there are moments when that drops – usually when you're playing on a TV and there's a lot of on-screen action. Whether you choose to play on the TV or on the Switch's glorious 720p screen, the experience is identical – another stunning achievement that is well worth commending. Horizon: Zero Dawn is undisputedly a better looking game, but can you take it with you on the bus?
Verdict: Play it Now
While Breath of the Wild's narrative has a definite beginning and end, you won't want to rush it – soaking in all the secrets and exploring every forest and mountain top become addictive pastimes, giving the game a longevity which few other open-world titles can muster. 
"A new high watermark not only for Nintendo as a developer of AAA content, but for the genre as a whole."
This isn't just the most accomplished Zelda adventure yet, it also ranks as one of the most impressive launch titles for any console, period. If you harbour any thoughts of picking up Nintendo's new console, then make no mistake – under no circumstances should you make a purchase without also buying this game. 
Breath of the Wild is a must-have release, and represents a new high watermark not only for Nintendo as a developer of AAA content, but for the genre as a whole. 
Polygon
231 d ago
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild beginner’s guide
Understanding the most ambitious Zelda game in generations
Continue reading…
IGN
231 d ago
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild Review
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild’s sheer freedom and sense of adventure is a remarkable achievement. Right from the start, the vast landscape of Hyrule is thrown completely open to you, and it constantly finds ways to pique your curiosity with mysterious landmarks, complex hidden puzzles, and enemy camps to raid for treasure and weapons. The fact that you can tackle any one of these things at your own pace and almost never get pulled to the main path is liberating, but the way all of Breath of the Wild’s systems fit elegantly into complex light survival game is even more impressive. I’ve been running around for over 50 hours and I still have plenty of mysteries left to track down and lots of wonderfully crafted puzzles to solve. I’m in awe of the scope and scale of this adventure, and I often find myself counting the hours until I can get back in.
Continue reading…
Ars Technica
231 d ago
Breath of the Wild may be the best Zelda game ever
*Cue heavenly choir*
At this point, the Legend of Zelda series operates on a rhythm so predictable you can practically set your watch to it. In a Zelda game, after an extremely slow-paced tutorial, you progress from puzzle-filled dungeon to puzzle-filled dungeon, finding in each one a key item that—coincidentally—is crucial to beating the dungeon boss and to finding the next dungeon.
Between dungeons, you face perfunctory battles with simple enemies on a vast overworld map dotted with small towns and occasional mini-games and side-quests. Most of these give you rewards that are already so plentiful as to be practically worthless (oh, goodie, more rupees to fill my already full wallet). By the time you reach Ganon, your circuitous trip from point A to point B has given you a set of required powers that help you take on the big bad boss threatening the kingdom. Individual Zelda games each make slight variations to this formula, but the basic rhythm is there every time.
And then there's the new Breath of the Wild (BotW), a Zelda game that throws off this established rhythm so quickly, and with such force, that it practically feels like a whole new genre. In doing so, Breath of the Wild offers a compelling take on a stagnating series, bringing a sense of wonder and excitement back to Zelda that hasn't been felt this strongly since the original NES game.
Read 35 remaining paragraphs | Comments
GameSpot
231 d ago
Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Review Roundup
On the eve of its launch, reviews for The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild have been published. Given that the last Zelda released for consoles was six years ago and that it's arriving on Switch , a brand new Nintendo platform, expectations are high.
Breath of the Wild looks like it will be meeting those expectations as reviews of the game are overwhelmingly positive. In GameSpot's The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild review , Peter Brown awarded it a 10/10, saying it is "a defining moment for The Legend of Zelda series, and the most impressive game Nintendo has ever created."
We've collected a number of other verdicts from various publications and put them in a list below. Take a look and, by the time you're done, you'll have a good overview of its critical reception. For a much wider critical view of Breath of the Wild, take a look at GameSpot's sister site Metacritic .
Game: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the WildDeveloper: NintendoPlatform: Nintendo SwitchRelease: March 3Price: US $60 / £50 / AU $90GameSpot -- 10/10
"No matter how gorgeous its environments are, how clever its enemies are, and how tricky its puzzles get, the fact that Breath of the Wild continues to surprise you with newfound rules and possibilities after dozens of hours is by far its most valuable quality. It's a game that allows you to feel gradually more and more empowered yet simultaneously manages to retain a sense of challenge and mystery--which, together, creates a steady, consistent feeling of gratification throughout the entire experience. Breath of the Wild is a defining moment for The Legend of Zelda series, and the most impressive game Nintendo has ever created." -- Peter Brown [ Full review ]
IGN -- 10/10
"The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is a masterclass in open-world design and a watershed game that reinvents a 30-year-old franchise. It presents a wonderful sandbox full of mystery, dangling dozens upon dozens of tantalizing things in front of you that just beg to be explored. I've had so many adventures in Breath of the Wild, and each one has a unique story behind what led me to them, making them stories on top of stories. And even after I've spent more than 50 hours searching the far reaches of Hyrule, I still manage to come across things I haven't seen before. I'll easily spend 50 to 100 more trying to track down its fascinating moments." -- Jose Otero [ Full review ]
Game Informer -- 10/10
"Breath of the Wild is an achievement in the design of a living world. Hyrule is massive, with multiple environmental systems layered on top of a grand adventure. The only technical issue I encountered was one related to the frame rate when fighting multiple enemies in busy forests. Despite the massive scope of the game, Breath of the Wild retains Nintendo's knack for polish without any major technical hiccups to disrupt the experience. I was entranced by this version of Hyrule, and it surprised me at nearly every turn, from its wealth of discoveries to the way it shuns the established tropes of previous Zelda games. It represents a profound new direction for one of gaming's best franchises and a new high point for open-world interactive experiences." -- Kyle Hilliard [ Full review ]
Polygon -- 10/10
"I guess, in the end, it's not just that Breath of the Wild signals that Zelda has finally evolved and moved beyond the structure it's leaned on for so long. It's that the evolution in question has required Nintendo to finally treat its audience like intelligent people. That newfound respect has led to something big, and different, and exciting. But in an open world full of big changes, Breath of the Wild also almost always feels like a Zelda game--and establishes itself as the first current, vital-feeling Zelda in almost 20 years." -- Arthur Gies [ Full review ]
Giant Bomb -- 5/5
This sense of wonder is something that I haven't felt so strongly since I played A Link to the Past when I was seven years old. Ocarina of Time was able to capture some of that same magic in my teenage years. Now that I'm in my thirties, I don't think that I expected it to be possible for a game to make me feel like that again. I've been reviewing video games for twelve years now, and I'm used to describing games in a certain way. "This game controls well. This mechanic is innovative. The graphics are stunning. The skill tree feels limited." That type of language doesn't adequately convey how Breath of the Wild made me feel. Nintendo may have changed so many long-standing traditions of the Zelda franchise, but the spirit of discovery is as strong as it's ever been no matter your age. I didn't think I'd feel the Zelda magic this strongly ever again, but I couldn't be happier to be proven wrong. -- Dan Ryckert [ Full review ]
GameSpot
231 d ago
How To Care For Your Horse in Zelda: Breath of the Wild
Rob wrangles up some tips for taming and caring for your horse in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.
GameSpot
231 d ago
Zelda: Breath of the Wild - Bokoblin Camp Ambush Gameplay
Watch as Link ambushes a group of camped out bokoblins in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild!
GameSpot
231 d ago
Zelda: Breath of the Wild - Flying Guardians Gameplay
Watch as Link does his best to avoid being spotted by the flying guardians in this The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild gameplay.
GameSpot
231 d ago
Zelda: Breath of The Wild - Early Weapons and Armor Gameplay
*MINOR SPOILERS WARNING* Check out some of the cool armor and weapons you can get in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.
GameSpot
231 d ago
Zelda: Breath of the Wild - Beginner's Guide
Surviving The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild
It's dangerous to go alone in the world of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild; the unwary can perish in a matter of seconds. That's why we've compiled 13 beginner's tips to help you overcome the game's early threats. Check back often as we update this feature with more tips.
Breath of the Wild comes out on March 3 as a launch title for the Nintendo Switch ; the game also arrives for Wii U on the same day. And even after you finish the game, there'll be more to play: Nintendo has announced a $20 DLC Pass for Breath of the Wild . For more details about the game, check out our feature covering everything you need to know about it . Otherwise, you can read all our written coverage and watch every video here .
Nintendo Switch launches on March 3 , priced at US $300/£280/AU $470. For all the games confirmed to be coming to Switch--but not necessarily at launch-- take a look at our roundup . You can also check out the console's main peripherals , as well as our in-depth feature of its menus and UI (user interface) . And if you're curious how the Switch compares to other consoles in terms of size, check out our size comparison .

Approach Battles Carefully, Think Tactically
Running headfirst into battle isn't always the best way to defeat a pack of enemies; it's often better to take a moment to formulate a plan of action before approaching. For example, if a Bokoblin encampment lies ahead, think about what you can do to eliminate them with as little trouble as possible. You could snipe their archers from a distance with your bow, and then sneak up to the larger group and throw a bomb at them to whittle away their numbers. Or you could even propel a large metal box toward the encampment using the Stasis ability's kinetic force. There are plenty of combat tactics that don't involve wasting your resources that are better than attempting to brute force your way to victory.

Save Powerful Weapons and Equipment For When It Matters
Unlike past Zelda games, almost all of Breath of the Wild's weapons and equipment have a durability mechanic, which causes items to wear down over time and eventually break after extensive use in battle. As you acquire more powerful weapons and equipment, be mindful of when you choose to use them. Save your higher-level equipment for tougher enemies and bosses, as opposed to wasting them against weaker foes that could easily perish against lower-leveled weapons.

It's Okay To Run
Don't think you need to engage in every combat encounter; there's no shame in running away. Your weapon and equipment resources are limited, so it's always in your best interest to avoid encounters if there's no goal in mind. The world is packed with enemies that can easily kill you in one hit. Choose your battles carefully or risk wasting your hard-earned weapons and equipment.

Save Often
As you explore the more hostile territories of Hyrule, be sure to save often. Aside from a handful of autosaves the game creates for you, you're allotted one manual saveslot. Take advantage of this whenever you need a safety cushion for a dangerous area ahead, or if you need to experiment with important quest and equipment choices that could affect your progression path.

How To Perform A Perfect Dodge, Parry, And Charged Attack
Against a tough enemy, there are three advanced and essential combat techniques: Perfect Dodge, Parry, and the Charged Attack.
Perfect Dodge allows you to slow down time after a precise dodge and inflict a devastating flurry attack upon an enemy. To execute a Perfect Dodge, jump out of the way of an attack right before it's about to hit you, and then press Y to perform the attack flurry.
Parry allows you to use your shield to deflect an enemy's blow, leaving it vulnerable to an immediate counterattack. To Parry, lock onto an enemy and press A right before their attack connects.
The Charged Attack allows you to perform a powerful offensive maneuver. Each weapon type sports a different Charged Attack. For instance, the sword has a 360-degree attack that covers you on all sides, while the spear has a flurry of stabs. To use a Charged Attack, simply hold the Y button in combat.

Seek Out Shrines
Shrines offer a nice diversion from prolonged periods of exploration; completing their puzzling challenges nets you Spirit Orbs, which can be used to purchase useful power-ups that expand your health or stamina. But another bonus you receive from beating a Shrine is the ability to unlock its location as a fast travel point. It's important to take time to complete shrines, as doing so benefits not only your health and stamina capacity, but also your ability to traverse Hyrule quickly and efficiently.

Avoid Guardians Like The Plague
Guardians are deadly six-legged foes that you should avoid at all costs (at least in the beginning of the game). Their charged shots can kill you in one hit, so keep your distance from them. If you're going to take a Guardian on (you really shouldn't yet), we suggest coming to the battle on horseback equipped with an arsenal of bomb arrows and elemental arrows. Be sure to slash at its legs to reduce its maneuverability, and aim at its center eye with your arrows to inflict high damage.

Slow-Motion Archer
It's possible to slow down time to shoot an arrow, which is an effective technique for picking off multiple enemies at time. To do so, simply pull out your bow while you're high up in the air (preferably from a glide). Keep in mind, the slow-motion only lasts as long as the amount of stamina you have, so if your stamina fully depletes in air, time will resume as normal.

Cooking Gives You Status Boost Items
Cooking is an essential part to your survival that can help you in myriad ways. To cook, simply choose a few ingredients from your inventory and drop them into a bonfire with a pot on it. Depending on the ingredients you choose, you'll get a dish or elixir that offers you a different status effect. For example, cooking a Raw Bird Drumstick and a Blue Nightshade together makes a dish that grants you a low-level stealth boost for two-and-a-half minutes.
You can find out more details about an ingredient's effect on a dish via its inventory explanation. But don't be too greedy with the ingredient types you choose, as using too many cancels out their effects and results in Dubious Food, a dish that only heals one heart.
Keep in mind that cooking status-affecting foods is restricted to bonfires with pots on them. An open fire can only roast or slightly cook food items. It's also impossible to cook while it's raining.

Do Not Use Metal Equipment During A Thunderstorm
If a thunderstorm starts to rage through Hyrule, make sure to remove all metal equipment; that includes armor, swords, shields, and bows. If you wear metal during a thunderstorm, you run the risk of being struck by lightning, which can kill you instantly. When you hear your metal equipment flash and flicker during a storm, that's your cue to jump into your inventory and remove it immediately.

Save That Axe: Bombs Can Chop Down Trees
In the southern section of the Great Plateau, you'll find the Old Man attempting to cut down a tree with an axe. He says you need an axe to cut down the tree ahead to clear a path across the cliffside gap. However, it's actually possible to cut down a tree by detonating a bomb near it. Simply place it at the foot of the tree in the direction you want the tree to fall.

Heavy Weapons Knock Away Enemy Shields
An enemy wielding a shield can block your attacks with ease. However, heavy weapons--like an axe or a hammer--can knock the shield out of their hands, making them vulnerable to attack. Utilize this technique whenever you're up against multiple enemies with shields.

You Can Stealth Kill Enemies
If you sneak up directly behind an enemy without them noticing, a prompt appears that allows you to deliver a devastating blow. This is an incredibly useful maneuver, as it nearly kills enemies in one blow, regardless of their level of health and defense.

GameSpot
213 d ago
Zelda: Breath Of the Wild - Things The Game Doesn't Tell You
Hidden In Hyrule...
In The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, there are myriad important mechanics and concepts that the game never explains outright. At times the game alludes to them, but the majority of the time, you're left to figure them out on your own, either by experimenting or completing a sidequest that introduces a particular mechanic. With so many veiled secrets, we've compiled 14 useful things to know to help you on your journey.
Be wary, there are potential spoilers ahead. Check back often as we update this feature with more secrets.
Breath of the Wild out now for both Nintendo Switch and Wii U . And even after you finish the game, there'll be more to play: Nintendo has announced a $20 DLC Pass for Breath of the Wild . For more details about the game, check out our feature covering everything you need to know about it . Otherwise, you can read all our written coverage and watch every video here .
Nintendo Switch is officially out now, priced at US $300/£280/AU $470. For all the games confirmed to be coming to Switch--but not necessarily at launch-- take a look at our roundup . You can also check out the console's main peripherals , as well as our in-depth feature of its menus and UI (user interface) . And if you're curious how the Switch compares to other consoles in terms of size, check out our size comparison .

How To Perform A Perfect Dodge, Parry, And Charged Attack
Against a tough enemy, there are three advanced and essential combat techniques: Perfect Dodge, Parry, and the Charged Attack.
Perfect Dodge allows you to slow down time after a precise dodge and inflict a devastating flurry attack upon an enemy. To execute a Perfect Dodge, jump out of the way of an attack right before it's about to hit you, and then press Y to perform the attack flurry.
Parry allows you to use your shield to deflect an enemy's blow, leaving it vulnerable to an immediate counterattack. To Parry, lock onto an enemy and press A right before their attack connects.
The Charged Attack allows you to perform a powerful offensive maneuver. Each weapon type sports a different Charged Attack. For instance, the sword has a 360-degree attack that covers you on all sides, while the spear has a flurry of stabs. To use a Charged Attack, simply hold the Y button in combat.

Using Your Final Breath While Climbing
While climbing, if you jump when your stamina wheel is in the red, you'll propel yourself upward twice the usual distance. This is a handy last resort technique that can be a life saver when you're just about to reach the top of a mountain, but can't make it by climbing alone.

You Can Retrieve Lost Arrows
If you miss an enemy with an arrow, don't worry; it's possible to pick it back up. The same works for enemy arrows, which you can pick up when they land at your feet. You can even retrieve the arrows that get stuck to your shield by putting it away. This is a great way to farm hundreds of arrows.
Regardless, when a battle is over, make sure to mine the battlefield for all the arrows that missed their mark.

How To Shieldboard
It's possible to use your shield to slide down hills and steep inclines. To do so, hold ZL to bring up your shield, then jump forward and press A. As you slide on your shield, you can shoot arrows or press the Y button to perform tricks. Note that sliding on your shield wears down its durability, so use this ability wisely.

How To Catch A Horse
If you want to travel faster through Hyrule, you should find and tame a horse. The best place to get a horse early on is at the Blatchery Plain (after the Dueling Peaks), where there are several roaming free. There are two types of horses to discover: spotted and one-color. Spotted horses are great for beginners, as they're easier to tame and aren't as ill-tempered. One-color horses more are difficult to tame and are often unwilling to follow your directions, but their higher stamina and speed more than make up for the grief.
To tame a horse, sneak up to one and hop onto its back, and then mash the L button to soothe it before it kicks you off. After you've earned the horse's respect, take it to the nearest stable to register it. This allows you to summon it whichever stable you're at if you ever get separated.
If you want your horse to perform at its very best, you need to be attentive to its performance. When it cooperates, make sure to reward it by soothing it or feeding it an apple. But keep in mind, it’s imperative to soothe your horse when it’s panicked or stressed.

Riding Wild Animals
It's actually possible to ride wild animals, such as bears and deer, like you would a horse, so long as you approach it carefully and with stealth bonuses activated. Unfortunately, wild animals aren't the most useful or reliable mounts, as they're far less compliant than horses. You also can't register them at stables for future travels. Despite these limitations, riding wild animals is a fun novelty well worth taking advantage of when the opportunity presents itself.

Slow-Motion Archer
It's possible to slow down time to shoot an arrow, which is an effective technique for picking off multiple enemies at time. To do so, simply pull out your bow while high up in the air (preferably from a glide). You can also execute the maneuver after jumping forward on horseback. Keep in mind, the slow-motion only lasts as long as the amount of stamina you have, so if your stamina fully depletes in air, time will resume as normal.

Talk To Wandering Merchants, Especially When It Rains
When you're travelling in-between towns, you'll encounter travelling merchants, who can sell you various equipment or cooking ingredients. Be sure to browse their wares when possible for supplies you might need. However, when it rains, merchants bust out their rare items. For example, a merchant that typically sells the Raw Meat ingredient during sunny weather will list the better, more effective Raw Prime Meat ingredient when it rains. If storm clouds start to appear, seek out merchants in the area; you never know what rare items you might be able to purchase.

Elemental Weapons Affect Your Body Temperature
Often in your journey, you'll work hard to figure out how to survive some of the world's more extreme weather conditions. There are a few specialized clothing options and elixirs that can help keep your body temperature in check, but there's actually a little known alternative: elemental weapons.
Elemental weapons affect your body temperature; depending on which you choose, your body temperature will either increase or decrease. For example, if you're in the hot, arid Gerudo desert, equipping an Ice Rod or a Great Frostblade will lower your body temperature. This is a handy technique to use in your travels, as it lets you keep your stronger armor equipped while in extreme climates. It's also a great option if you simply lack the other survival options available to you.

Reawaken The Great Fairy To Upgrade Your Armor
If you go up the hill from the Tal'oh Neag Shrine in Kakariko Village, you'll find a plant pod in a forest clearing. Hidden inside the pod is the Great Fairy Cotera, who requests 100 Rupees from you to reawaken her power. If you oblige, she can upgrade your armor using components you find out in the world. For example, to enhance the Hylian Tunic, you need to give her Bokoblin Horns. It's important to note that an armor set gains a special bonus after Cotera enhances each part twice.

Dogs Lead You To Treasure
If you find a dog in any of the towns or stables, don't just crouch down and nuzzle it. Feed the pup three pieces of meat or fruit to show it you care. After doing so, it'll lead you to a treasure chest hidden in the surrounding area. For example, if you feed the dog in Hateno Village, it takes you to a chest containing a Silver Rupee. Make sure to feed all the pups in Hyrule to acquire all sorts of secret treasure.

You Can Reassign Your Essence
In Hateno Village, you can find a mopey-looking statue at the bottom of the hill on the other side of the village entrance. If you talk to it, you'll initiate a sidequest where the statue steals some of your essence (either a Heart Container or a Stamina Vessel); speak to it again to reclaim what was taken from you. The statue offers you a deal where you can sell it one of your Heart Containers or Stamina Vessels for 100 Rupees. This might sound like a bad trade-off at first, but you're actually able to talk to it again and pay 120 rupees to acquire either a Heart Container or a Stamina Vessel in return. This is a handy resource, as you're essentially paying 20 Rupees to reassign the upgrades you've acquired throughout your journey.

Grab Fairies To Get Revives
It's possible to grab small fairies floating in the air. Doing so turns them into a usable item, which can revive you when your health fully depletes. As a result, fairies are a precious commodity that shouldn't be wasted. You can typically find fairies near any of the three Great Fairy fountains or hiding in tall grass.

You Can Stealth Kill Enemies
If you sneak up directly behind an enemy without them noticing, a prompt appears that allows you to deliver a devastating blow. This is an incredibly useful maneuver, as it nearly kills enemies in one blow, regardless of their level of health and defense.

You Can Parry Guardian Laser Shots
Guardians are a tremendous threat early on, mostly because of their incredibly destructive laser blasts. But if you have decent reflexes, you can actually parry a Guardian's laser blast with your shield, and send it straight back at them.
To do so, get close to a Guardian and wait for it to charge up a shot. When you hear a beep, that's your cue to press A. Do this three times to make a standard Guardian explode; though, a stationary Guardian can be destroyed with one shot.
Once you've mastered parrying Guardian shots, these once dangerous foes become much less threatening. It's also one of the most efficient ways to defeat a Guardian, as it doesn't require any weapon use, nor does it wear down your shield's durability. Be wary, this tactic is incredibly ineffective against multiple Guardians, as it can only be implemented while locking onto one of them, so once again: don't push your luck!

Lighting Grass On Fire Creates An Updraft
Lighting grass on fire creates a temporary updraft that you can use to skyrocket yourself up into the air with your glider. This has a variety of applications, such as creating height between you and an approaching Guardian or propelling yourself upward to give you more time in the air.

You Can Plow Through Guardians With Your Horse
It's possible to use your horse to charge straight through a Guaridan. Simply spur your horse in the direction of an approaching Guardian and watch as it tumbles over the both of you. It's worth noting that if you don't charge through the Guardian's center base, it might not flinch much from your charge, so be careful in your approach and make sure to keep spurring your horse on to maximize your force of impact. This technique can also be used repeatedly to tear off a Guardian's legs, drastically hindering its movement.

You Can Buy A House
When you enter Hateno, you can find a group of construction workers attempting to tear down a house near the Myahm Agana Shrine. If you talk to their head foreman Bolson, he'll ask you if you want to purchase the house. Accept his offer to strike a deal to acquire the house for a sum of 3,000 Rupees and 30 bundles of wood.
After buying the house, Bolson can furnish it with various upgrades. For example, you can ask him to install a door or to make you a bed you can use to rest overnight. However, each upgrade is going to cost you 100 Rupees.

Talk To The Giant Korok To Expand Your Inventory Space
On your way to Kakariko Village, you encounter a giant Korok named Hestu, who pleads with you to retrieve its maracas from a pack of Bokoblins. Completing this task earns you the ability to upgrade your inventory space, but at a cost. Hestu asks that you supply him with Korok seeds he can use to fix his now-broken maracas. These special seeds can only be acquired by finding Korok hidden in the environment. For example, you can find one hidden beneath a rock on top of one of the Pillars of Levia. For every Korok seed you bring Hestu, he'll upgrade the space of an inventory category of your choice.
Keep an eye out for anything that seems out of place in the environment. If something seems amiss, chances are that there's a Korok hiding there.

Upgrading Your Sheikah Slate's Functionality, And The Sheikah Sensor+
It's possible to enhance functionality of the Sheikah Slate's abilities by talking to Purah at the Ancient Tech Lab in Hateno Village. But make it a priority of upgrading the Sheikah Sensor, which requires three Ancient Springs. Doing so allows you to use it to sense the presence of specific objects in the world, just as long as you take a picture of it first. For example, you can set the Sheikah Sensor to go off whenever a Sunshroom is nearby. This expanded functionality proves useful when you're trying to pinpoint the location of specific weapons, ingredients, or animals you need to track.

Amiibo Net You Classic Rewards
It's made apparent early on that you can scan amiibo to get new weapons and items. But if you scan amiibo of classic Zelda characters, you can get special armor and weapons from past games. For example, when you scan the Toon Link amiibo, you have a chance of acquiring Wind Waker-inspired armor pieces. You can even obtain new mounts, like the iconic Epona, which you can get when you scan the Super Smash Bros. series Link amiibo.
It's worth noting that each amiibo can only be scanned once per day, and that items are randomized. In addition, certain items are only available to its respective amiibo, so don't expect to get Sheik's Mask from the Ganondorf amiibo.
If you're interested in donning on the classic Link outfits from past games, be sure to take advantage of Breath of the Wild's amiibo functionality.

You Can Dye Your Clothes
In Hateno village, the second shop to the right allows you to dye your clothes various colors for the cost of 20 rupees. You also need five items that share in the dye color you wish to use. These can be any materials you find out in the wild. For example, items like the Bokoblin Horn and Moblin Fang can be used to dye your clothes grey.
Keep in mind the shopkeeper dyes your entire outfit the color you choose, so it's best to mix and match what you want colored for more efficient use of your money. But if you change your mind about the colors you choose, you can always revert back to the original color scheme for another 20 Rupees.

You Can Take Selfies
Similar to The Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker HD, you can take selfies in Breath of the Wild with your Sheikah Slate's camera. Simply turn on the camera with the L button, and then press X to activate "Self-Portrait" mode. Moving the left stick in different directions changes Link's pose, maximizing the photo's social media effectiveness.

You Can Customize Your Horse
After spending hours traveling across Hyrule on horseback, do you ever find yourself wishing you could customize the appearance of your trusty steed? Well, Breath of the Wild makes it possible. Simply go to the Outskirt Stable, which lies to the North of the Great Plateau and West of the Coliseum Ruins.
When you reach the stable, talk to Canni, the lady tending the horses outside. She offers to change out your horse's saddle or bridle with any new ones you've found. She also lets you alter the mane of your horse. Looking to style your horse's mane with some sweet french-braids? Or maybe you'd like to give it a long, flowing green mane? Canni can make it happen.
Keep in mind, Canni only offers her services to horses that are raised with lots of love, so if you don't have a max bond with your horse, she'll reject you.

How To Refresh Rusty Weapons
You'll often encounter a fair amount of rusty weapons, which while useful at first, eventually become obsolete as you find stronger weapons to add to your arsenal. But don't just ignore every rusty weapon you find. Make sure to keep a couple in your inventory for the inevitable moment you encounter a Rock Octorok in the Death Mountain region.
This might seem strange, but try tossing a rusty weapon onto the ground for the little critter to suck up. After it does so, wait a few seconds and it'll spit out the weapon in brand-new condition. Keep in mind, the weapon it spews out is randomized based on the weapon type. For example, if you toss it a Rusty Broadsword, you might get a Traveller's Sword, while another time, you'll get the more powerful Royal Broadsword. Take advantage of this refurbishment technique to nab some decently powered weapons.

You Can Bring A Horse Back From The Dead
Have you ever recklessly let your trusty steed die in the middle of a battle, and spent the rest of your journey in depressed? Don't worry, it's actually possible to bring your horse back to life. But you can't do it with the help of folks at the stable. Rather, you need to seek out the help of Malanya, the Great Horse Fairy.
To find her, head to the Lake Tower region to the south and find the Highland Stable. From there, head southeast towards the Horse God bridge. When you reach the end of the path you'll find what looks like a Great Fairy Fountain. Examine it and pay Malanya the flat fee of 1,000 rupees to access her services. Talk to her again, and she'll work her magic to bring your steed back from the grave. Note that you can do this as many times as you'd like at no additional rupee cost to you.

Weaponized Cucco Swarm
Like in past Zelda games, if you use excessive force against a Cucco, it'll call upon a swarm of its friends to attack you. While triggering a Cucco swarm isn't in your best interest, it's possible to make it work in your favor. Simply grab a Cucco and bring it with you into battle, and whichever unfortunate enemy happens to hit you will be swarmed and pecked to death. It's important to note that a Cucco swarm only does minimal damage against higher-leveled enemies, like Guardians and Lynels, so don't push your luck.

Kilton's Monster Shop
Hidden in the outskirts of Hyrule is a mysterious merchant named Kilton. To find this eccentric peddler, wait until nighttime, and then head to the left "eye" of Skull Lake, which is located northwest of Death Mountain.
When you talk to Kilton, he tells you he's going to set up shop at various villages across the land before disappearing to do just that. To find him, search the outskirts of any of the main villages and towns between 8 P.M. to 4 A.M. Kilton's shop is relatively easy to identify; it appears as a patchwork hot-air balloon from a distance.
Once you find him, Kilton sells an assortment of useful and quirky monster-related items, such as the much sought-after Monster Extract cooking ingredient, or a Moblin Mask, which allows you to blend in with Moblins. However, you can only purchase these items using a special currency known as Mon, which you can acquire by trading in monster parts to Kilton.
Make sure to visit Kilton's shop often, as he frequently stocks up on a variety of new and useful items.

GameSpot
231 d ago
The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Review
From its mysterious opening to its action-packed conclusion, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is a revolution for Nintendo's revered series. It's both a return to form and a leap into uncharted territory, and it exceeds expectations on both fronts. The game takes designs and mechanics perfected in other games and reworks them for its own purposes to create something wholly new, but also something that still feels quintessentially like a Zelda game. It's a truly magical work of art that embodies Nintendo's unique talents, and a game that everyone should play regardless of their affinity for the series' past.
More than a typical Hyrule fantasy, Breath of the Wild is a daunting survival game that forces you to think in entirely new ways. You have to be cautious, creative, and resourceful in your efforts to battle the wilderness. Outside of armor, you have to source everything from the field. You earn new weapons by stealing from enemies and prepare restorative meals and elixirs by combining resources found in the environment. Death comes quickly, and whether it's at the hand of a formidable enemy or because you charged unprepared down a treacherous path, you're forced to reconsider almost everything you've learned from past Zelda games. There's so much to see, to accomplish, and to learn that you never feel like you have control over the world. This is a great thing. Where so many games front-load excitement and wonder, Breath of the Wild sustains the thrill of unexpected discoveries throughout.
Amazement sets in immediately after emerging from a tomb-like cave where the familiar hero Link has spent the last 100 years in hibernation. When he trots to the edge of a cliff and the new, massive Hyrule comes into view, you're faced with the striking scale of the world, which is by far the largest the series has ever seen. You will cross vast plains and towering mountains to achieve your goals, all the while contending with harsh weather and Link's physical limitations. Despite a few instances of frame rate dips, Hyrule is consistently impressive to behold, triggering bliss and excitement in equal measure.
You begin your series-standard quest to defeat Ganon and rescue Princess Zelda with little more than a tree branch to defend yourself from roaming goblins. However, it doesn't take long to build up a diverse arsenal. Nearly every enemy carries a weapon or a shield, and if you can beat them, their gear is yours for the taking. This is also a godsend given that every weapon has finite durability. You will blow through dozens if not hundreds of weapons during your adventure, which no doubt feels strange at first, especially since gear often defined your progress in previous Zelda games. It can feel crushing when a particularly cool weapon is destroyed mid-battle, but you learn to move on. There's no shortage of new gear to discover, and though you aren't able to utilize a consistent stable of familiar weapons, you learn to expect that for every one you've lost, there's something better coming down the road.
In practice, the weapon you wield is important but not necessarily as important as how you control it. Enemies are intelligent and utilize wildly different tactics that force you to diligently study every aspect of their behavior. Basic enemies can be toppled through careful use of a shield, but there are harder enemies that will destroy this defense in a single hit. In these cases, it’s imperative that you parry or dodge an attack at just the right time, which will trigger a moment of slow-motion that allows you to unleash a flurry of attacks against your vulnerable foe. These moves are your last line of defense when the going gets tough, and they require precise timing to execute. Given the myriad enemies and weapons you're up against, mastery feels almost unattainable even with substantial practice. However, that also means you are constantly learning in the face of unforeseen challenges.
There are innumerable unexpected events that can happen. The game never teaches you, for example, that holstering your shield after blocking enemy arrows will add them to your inventory. You're never told that grazing an enemy's wooden weapon with a fire arrow by accident will set it ablaze, thus making the fight harder for you in the long run. These occurrences fuel exciting stories between players, which feels like a rarity in a world where games go so far out of the way to ensure that you know how everything works. Even 50 hours in--and after you're capable of bringing down Ganon--there are still intimidating enemies to be found and intricate rules to study. Your power and wisdom grow as you progress, but you never feel totally invincible, which allows even late-game exploration to be feel tense and rewarding.
Beyond weaponry, Link gains access to magical skills known as runes. These include the ability to move metallic objects with a magical tether, which can be useful for, among other tricks, dropping large iron boxes on unsuspecting enemies. Link can also freeze enemies and objects in place for a limited amount of time. When an object is frozen, it absorbs energy rather than reacting immediately to whatever force you lay into it. And when time unfreezes, all that collected force is exerted in an instant. This allows you to move objects that are otherwise too heavy for Link to control, and gives you a chance to strike a defenseless enemy multiple times without fear of reprisal. Runes prove to be a wonderful source of creativity and problem solving, both in combat and when managing puzzles.
The game's four main dungeons are primarily puzzle focused, with only a few enemies sprinkled throughout. They are a bit unusual compared to dungeons in past Zelda games in that you aren't focused on finding keys to open doors. Instead, the goal is to manipulate the dungeon itself, to literally change its form in order to access important areas. It's a wonderful break from tradition, while you still get a challenging boss battle to look forward to at the end. Gone are the oddly charming bosses from Zelda's past; they've been replaced with dark and twisted fiends that are powerful combatants. Like your fights against normal enemies, you have to move and act deliberately, or suffer for your cockiness.
Breath of the Wild's big dungeons are important, but they are almost less of a draw than the smaller shrines that dot the world. There are reportedly 100 of these mini-dungeons strewn across the map, and the vast majority of them feature puzzles that test your understanding and mastery of Link's rune abilities. Some can be completed in a few minutes, but there are plenty more containing extensive, multi-step processes. Compared to roughing it in nature, these brain teasers are an excellent respite, and make great use of Breath of the Wild's impressive physics system. Figuring out what to do is only half the battle. The rest comes down to precise execution. Therefore, solving even simple puzzles can feel immensely rewarding.
When you look across Hyrule in search of your next destination, the faint orange glow of a new shrine is difficult to ignore. They are one of many distractions that cause you to veer off track. Seeking them out won't help you complete the game any faster--not that you should rush through Breath of the Wild in the first place--but they are rewarding opportunities that expose you to the far corners of Hyrule, where you often catch whiffs of something new and mysterious laying in wait.
Somewhat surprisingly, exploration often proves far more challenging than combat or puzzle solving. Link travels primarily on foot, and he can sprint as long as his stamina meter allows before having to catch his breath. Link can also climb vertical surfaces like cliffs and walls now, but again, he's at the mercy of his physical strength. Exploration may be a struggle at times due to Link's limitations and harsh weather that hinders his capabilities, but to avoid long treks is to rob yourself of some of the best moments of discovery in Breath of the Wild, and the sense of satisfaction you feel for overcoming its most foreboding environments. Equipping metal weapons and armor will turn Link into a veritable lightning rod, and if you're climbing a mountain when it starts to rain, you won't be able to climb more than a few feet before losing your grip and sliding back down. Bring a wooden shield to the fiery slopes of Mount Eldin, and watch it set ablaze on your back while Link's health slowly slips away.
Hyrule is a beautiful world to behold from the top of a mountain, but perching Link on high has other benefits. In addition to runes, Link obtains a paraglider early on in the game, which he then carries with him at all times. It's useful when you fall off a tall building or cliff, but it's also a source of levity after taxing fights and daunting hikes. Your reward for scaling a mountain or tower is the opportunity to soar through the sky and cross large tracts of land with your glider. And if you're skillful, you can use your shield as a veritable snowboard to glide down grassy hills and frozen slopes. Granted, Link can surf down hills at any time as long as his shield can handle the wear and tear, but it’s especially gratifying to drop onto a slope after flying over a massive canyon or a dense forest and coast into a town in style.
The few towns that exist in the new Hyrule mimic the understated and rural qualities seen in Studio Ghibli's Princess Mononoke. Equally charming are the hikers you meet on trails. These lonely yet upbeat adventurers offer humorous quips, or perhaps a side quest with a quirky premise. You spend so much time fighting to survive, all while under the cloud of your impending fight with the dark and powerful Ganon. By contrast, your interactions with NPCs are opportunities to slow down and help out a friendly stranger in need. Though you have an overarching goal in mind, Breath of the Wild's delightful distractions often prove to be its most memorable moments.
If you've ever hiked deep into the wilderness and found yourself awash in wonderment and perhaps guilt for living a life steeped in modern indulgences, Breath of the Wild's reverence for the natural world will strike a chord. It's the way the rising sun graces blades of grass as you climb a steep hill. It's the flutter of a few well-timed piano notes that dance in your ear and harmonize with your internal childlike amazement. And it's the unwavering delight and excitement that each new discovery brings. It can come when you reveal a new portion of the world map and find a curious landmark, but there's an almost endless stream of smaller discoveries to make as you move about Hyrule.
No matter how gorgeous its environments are, how clever its enemies are, and how tricky its puzzles get, the fact that Breath of the Wild continues to surprise you with newfound rules and possibilities after dozens of hours is by far its most valuable quality. It's a game that allows you to feel gradually more and more empowered yet simultaneously manages to retain a sense of challenge and mystery--which, together, creates a steady, consistent feeling of gratification throughout the entire experience. Breath of the Wild is a defining moment for The Legend of Zelda series, and the most impressive game Nintendo has ever created.
The Guardian
231 d ago
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild – Link has never been set so free
The Nintendo Switch launch title takes the Zelda franchise to a whole new level, producing something even greater than the sum of its finely honed parts
Nintendo tricked us all. For years, it gave the impression that it was content to live in its own little corner of the gaming world, making well-received updates to its own franchises, without really caring about what the wider industry was doing.
Now we know that for all that time, it was watching and learning. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is the result of that examination: a game that marries the best bits of the franchise’s long history with the best bits of the rest of the gaming world, and produces something even greater than the sum of its parts.
Continue reading...
WIRED
231 d ago
With Breath of the Wild, Zelda Finally Loses Its Way. And I Love It
In a striking return to form, the newest Zelda game captures the joy of getting lost in an eclipsing, unfamiliar wilderness. The post With Breath of the Wild, Zelda Finally Loses Its Way. And I Love It appeared first on WIRED .
GameSpot
231 d ago
Zelda: Breath Of The Wild's Day One Update Adds DLC Menu
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild 's day one update, which is out now, introduces a new menu option allowing you to see what DLC is available for the game. It is unclear what else is included in the patch.
The only DLC available right now is the content offered to those who've already purchased the game's season pass . This includes three new treasure chests, which contain "useful items" and "exclusive in-game clothing," according to Nintendo.
The season pass--which is available for both the Switch and Wii U versions of Breath of the Wild--will include two full expansions: one will launch in "Summer 2017" and one in "Holiday 2017." They'll include new challenges, difficulty settings, dungeons, and more. The add-ons cannot be purchased individually.
Breath of the Wild launches on March 3. Reviews have now gone live for the latest Zelda title, and it seems critics are more than impressed . In our Zelda: Breath of the Wild review , critic Peter Brown called the game "a defining moment for The Legend of Zelda series, and the most impressive game Nintendo has ever created."
He added: "No matter how gorgeous its environments are, how clever its enemies are, and how tricky its puzzles get, the fact that Breath of the Wild continues to surprise you with newfound rules and possibilities after dozens of hours is by far its most valuable quality. It's a game that allows you to feel gradually more and more empowered yet simultaneously manages to retain a sense of challenge and mystery--which, together, creates a steady, consistent feeling of gratification throughout the entire experience."
Read the full review here .
GameSpot
231 d ago
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild Switch Livestream
Join Rob and Peter as they explore the land of Hyrule. They'll be showing off combat, trials, snowboarding, horse play, and more. There will be no story spoilers.
Polygon
231 d ago
Zelda: Breath of the Wild is already one of the best-reviewed games of all time
Nintendo’s first big release of 2017 may also be its best
Continue reading…
Motherboard
231 d ago
We Asked Chaturbate Streamers Why They're Horny For 'Zelda: Breath of the Wild'
Your dad plays Candy Crush, your grandma plays Skyrim , basically everyone plays games these days, and that includes the people who stream their sexploits on camera for a living. If you're a modern day human, you've probably happened across a site where guys, girls, and others stream themselves nude, masturbating, fucking, sucking or eating ass like it's their job (because it literally is).
Personally, I frequent Chaturbate , which is the sex equivalent of popular game streaming site Twitch, only with a lot less gaming and a lot more porkin'. Men, women, and trans performers show off their naughty bits live in hopes of earning tips from horny viewers in the form of tokens that can be purchased through the site. Performers interact with their audience in real time in chats filled with requests and memes, though unlike Twitch these usually involve nudity. If you thought Twitch chats were depraved... well you're not wrong, but Chaturbate's chat can get downright vile considering it's mostly men demanding women perform sex acts for like a fiver.
Since some of the models game on stream before or after acts, or have gaming related items in the background behind them during sex, I set out to find out a little bit more about their gaming habits; specifically, what games they were currently playing and what games they were looking forward to this year. Turns out that when not playing with themselves, cammers are a lot like us, as a majority of them are looking forward to the very soon to be released The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. The surprising part? Most of them are planning on getting it on the Wii U.
Speaking to Ysera (who goes by the name of 8bitdeviants )—whose page features lots of gaming imagery including art from the original Zelda and walls covered in Samurai Warriors and Kingdom Hearts posters—I found that she was currently playing the remake of Dragon Quest 7 that released in late 2016. As far as upcoming games she said she is looking forward to picking up the recently delayed Persona 5 and the new Zelda for Wii U as the Nintendo Switch "isn't worth playing until Mario comes out, so I don't see a reason to buy the Switch," an opinion echoed by many people disappointed with the Switch's early lineup of games . Ysera also stated she, "doesn't want a female Link. Link is Link. Also, Linkle was awful."
Anthony19cal , a hung bi guy with a buff, shirtless Mega Man superimposed over his stream and a Zelda poster in the background was warming up his giant schlong for a nice self-suck session on cam when he told me he is hyped for Breath of the Wild but plans on getting it on the Wii U because he can't afford a Switch right now. Otherwise, he has just been playing World of Warcraft recently, when not blowing himself for others to enjoy, of course.
Image: Ysera's profile page
Not everyone was so eager to talk about gaming, even though they were clearly big fans. Shanehall was one such person, who I stumbled across dressed up as a sexy version of Sora, the lead character from the popular RPG franchise that combines Final Fantasy and Disney characters into one strange universe. As I loaded Shane's camera someone in his chat tipped him 25 tokens (that equates to a whopping $1.25), which bought them a prize from a virtual prize board. The prize? 10 push-ups, which Shane excitedly did on camera while explaining he likes to keep fit and this is a fun way to do it. Perhaps he has given up gaming for getting paid to exercise on a sex streaming site? Who can blame him, truly that is the American dream.
I asked over 50 other gaming cammers the same questions and found that currently the most popular game among them is Blizzard's popular hero-based shooter Overwatch, with World of Warcraft coming in just behind it. Aside from the overwhelming amount of people saying they were mostly looking forward to the Wii U version of Breath of the Wild, there weren't very many other answers aside from Persona 5 and "whatever horror games are coming out this year." Most people gave the same reason when asked why the Wii U version and not the Switch version of Zelda, which was a lack of funds. That may indicate that sexing online for money probably isn't the most lucrative job as you'd imagine, though supposedly girls make between $100 and $1000 a day , which isn't exactly pocket change.
So what did we learn? Nothing, really, other than that if you fuck on camera for others to watch, and you game, you're probably buying the Wii U version of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, and that's okay, you're not alone.
Polygon
231 d ago
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild patched with DLC support
Prepare for the Expansion Pass
Continue reading…
GameSpot
231 d ago
Taking Down Guardians In Zelda: Breath Of The Wild
Watch as Link takes down these ancient foes in style!
Mashable
231 d ago
Learn how to speedrun 'Zelda: Breath of the Wild' before it's even out
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild isn't out yet. It'll be released on March 3. But hey, look at that: someone's already got a route laid out for speedruns.
Streamer SethBling received an early Switch and a copy of Zelda after he made his speedrun intentions clear to Nintendo. He's been spending a lot of time playing — roughly 12 hours per day for the past week — and he's plotted out a viable speedrun route that he chronicles in a 95-minute video.
It's embedded right here, though view it at your own risk: there are spoilers galore, including a playthrough of the game's final boss fight. If you plan to play the game yourself, just wait — but keep this video filed away for future use. Read more...
More about Nintendo , The Legend Of Zelda , The Legend Of Zelda Breath Of The Wild , Gaming , and Entertainment
GameSpot
197 d ago
Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Guides And Tips
Unlike recent games in the series, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is fairly indirect in how it shepherds you through its world. While it reveals some details, most of the time it's up to you to figure out how to survive. That's why we've compiled all of our in-depth guides to better help you in your journey to understand and overcome the game's myriad threats and mysteries. Keep in mind, there are potential spoilers in some of the guides below.
You can also check out our full review of the game , as well as our feature detailing everything you need to know about it. Be sure to check back often as we update this article with our upcoming Breath of the Wild guides and features.
Table of Contents [ hide ] Early Game Guides Beginner's Guide Things The Game Doesn't Tell You How To Care For Your Horse How To Survive Every Environment All The Weapons We've Found (So Far) All The Armor We've Found (So Far) How To Make Money How To Find Korok Seeds Cooking Tips And Tricks Late Game Guides Great Fairy Fountain Locations How To Find The Master Sword All The Memory Locations How to Defeat Breath of the Wild's Mini-Bosses How To Get The Best Armor Sets Guides to Fun Unlockables How To Get Monster Masks How To Dye Your Clothes Amiibo Unlock Guide Everything You Can Ride How To Buy A House
Early Game GuidesBeginner's Guide
It's dangerous to go alone in the world of Breath of the Wild; the unwary can perish in a matter of seconds. That's why we've compiled beginner's tips to help you become a veteran survivalist of Hyrule. For a condensed take on what you need to know, watch the video above. Otherwise, check out our comprehensive guide for the full details. [ Beginner's Guide ]
Things The Game Doesn't Tell You
There are numerous important mechanics and concepts that the game never explains outright. At times the game alludes to them, but the majority of the time, you're left to figure them out on your own, either by experimenting or completing a sidequest that introduces a particular mechanic. With so many veiled secrets, we've compiled a plethora of useful things to know to help you on your journey. [ Things The Game Doesn't Tell You ]
How To Care For Your Horse
Breath of the Wild changes the tradition from past games in the series by removing Link's iconic trusty steed, Epona. Instead, you must find your own horse. Check out the video above for some tips on how to better tame and care for it. [ How To Care For Your Horse ]
How To Survive Every Environment
Pretty much everywhere you go in Zelda: Breath of the Wild can be dangerous, but some areas require more specific preparation than others. Venturing out in the middle of a thunderstorm or scaling a snowy mountain can be deadly, if not downright impossible, without the right gear, items, and knowledge. Here’s what you need to know to survive in almost every situation. For a condensed version of the guide, watch the video above. Otherwise, check out our comprehensive version for the full details. [ How To Survive Every Environment ]
All The Weapons We've Found (So Far)
There are plenty of weapons to find in Breath of the Wild. In our time spent with the game, we've found quite the arsenal. Take a look at all the weapons that we've found so far. [ All The Weapons We've Found (So Far) ]
All The Armor We've Found (So Far)
Breath of the Wild has a plethora of awesome armor sets to discover. In our time spent with the game, we've been able to find a decent amount. Check out each armor set we've found thus far. [ All The Armor We've Found (So Far) ]
How To Make Money
Money can be hard to come by in Zelda: Breath of the Wild , but if you’re resourceful, you can get rich in no time. We detail seven tips to keep your pockets full of Rupees. Check out our comprehensive version for the full details. [ How To Make Money ]
How To Find Korok Seeds
If you’ve been playing through Zelda: Breath of the Wild for even a few hours, you might have noticed that you have very little inventory space for weapons, bows, and shields. Luckily, you can expand your inventory slots! All you have to do is find Koroks, children of the forest that are hiding all over the map. When you find one, it will give you a Korok seed, which you can then trade to an adorable musician named Hestu for inventory slots. There are 11 different kinds of Korok hiding spots and 900 Korok seeds total--you can get them all for completion, but you’ll only need 441 to max out your inventory slots. Rather than show all 900 locations, we’ve put together everything you need to know to find as many as you need. [ How To Find Korok Seeds ]
Cooking Tips And Tricks
Cooking is essential to your survival in Breath of the Wild. Eating food raw will restore a very small amount of your hearts, but cooking food will maximize its health benefits--and sometimes grant you useful side effects, like the cold resistance you need to safely travel through snow. For a condensed version of the guide, watch the video above. Otherwise, check out our comprehensive version for the full details. [ Cooking Tips And Tricks ]
Late Game GuidesGreat Fairy Fountain Locations
It's possible to upgrade your armor in the game. But to do so, you must reawaken the power of any of the four Great Fairies that exist in the world. However, finding them is a difficult task if you're not sure where to look. Here are details on how to find the Great Fairies, as well as how to reawaken them. For a condensed version of the guide, watch the video above. Otherwise, check out our comprehensive version for the full details. [ Great Fairy Fountain Locations ]
How To Find The Master Sword
Breath of the Wild breaks away from tradition, discarding many of the time-honored tropes the series has been known for. Despite this, it still keeps a few iconic elements from past games. The most notable is the Master Sword, which remains a useful tool you can use to complete your quest. But acquiring the blade is no easy task, as it's hidden somewhere beyond your reach. Here are directions to help you find the Master Sword. [ How To Find The Master Sword ]
All The Memory Locations
As you explore, you can discover special cutscenes called Captured Memories. These scenes are triggered when you reach specific locations that correspond to photographs in your Sheikah Slate's album. Finding these memories is difficult, as it requires an intimate knowledge of the world. To help you obtain and find all the memories, we've compiled a guide with details on the locations of all 12. [ All The Memory Locations ]
How to Defeat Breath of the Wild's Mini-Bosses
Are the Lynels causing you trouble? Is the Stone Talus rocking your world? Here are some pointers on how to take down Breath of the Wild's massive mini-bosses. [ How to Defeat Breath of the Wild's Mini-Bosses ]
How To Get The Best Armor Sets
You start your adventure with nothing but an old shirt and well-worn trousers. But as you progress, there are myriad armor sets to find that offer more useful bonuses than just an increase to your defense. Whether it’s a boost to your attack or climbing speed, there's something for every situation. That's why we've compiled a guide on how to find the best armor sets available in the game. [ How To Get The Best Armor Sets ]
Guides to Fun UnlockablesHow To Get Monster Masks
You can find monster masks in the game, which allow you to blend in with the corresponding enemy it represents. They're handy pieces of equipment that are well worth tracking down. Check out how to find monster masks and Kilton, the eccentric merchant that sells them. For a condensed version of the guide, watch the video above. Otherwise, check out our comprehensive version for the full details. [ How To Get Monster Masks ]
How To Dye Your Clothes
Unlike previous games in the series, Breath of the Wild allows you to change the color of your clothing. To do so, you need to talk to Sayge, the manager of Kochi Dye Shop in Hateno Village. Below you can find details on where to find him and what you need to do in order to dye your clothes. [ How To Dye Your Clothes ]
For more on The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, check out the news stories below.
Amiibo Unlock Guide
The official Nintendo page for the The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild lists Amiibo that are compatible with the game, but it provides few other firm details. Fortunately, we've tirelessly been scanning various Amiibo into our games here at the office to try and lock down exactly what items you can get. [ Amiibo Unlock Guide ]
Everything You Can Ride
There are a wide variety of creatures you can tame and ride in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild . Whether you're riding on horseback or plowing through enemies atop a bear, you have no shortage of mounts to ride across the Hyrule countryside. [ Everything You Can Ride ]
How To Buy A House
The game allows you to purchase your own house. And the best part is that you can get one relatively early in the game. Check out how to become a homeowner in the land of Hyrule, as well as how to expand the benefits you receive from it. For a condensed version of the guide, watch the video above. Otherwise, read our comprehensive version for the full details. [ How To Buy A House ]
For more on The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, check out the news stories below.
The Day One Update Adds DLC Menu Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Review Roundup See What's In The Game's Limited Edition In This Unboxing Video Nintendo Defends, Explains The Game's DLC Pass Zelda Boss Teases A "Trick" For Handling Open-World Storytelling Issues
GameSpot
231 d ago
Zelda: Breath of the Wild - Boss Battle Gameplay
*SPOILERS* This is a video in which we fight one of the bosses in The Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild. Not even gonna tell you who it is because I care about you too much.
GameSpot
230 d ago
9 Spoiler-Free Beginner's Tips For Zelda: Breath of the Wild
Ready to go off on that new Zelda brand adventure? Hold on! It's dangerous to go without this guide with 9 tips for starting your adventure off on the right boot!
Venture Beat
230 d ago
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild makes chemistry just as important as physics
You’ve probably heard of physics engines in games. But what about chemistry engines?
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild’s technical director, Takuhiro Dohta, talked about some of the open-world game’s design philosophies at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco. The anticipated title launches soon (it might even be out by the time you’re reading this). It’ll be available as a launch title for the Switch on March 3, and it’s coming out for the Wii U that same day. We gave it a score of 100/100 in our review
Dohta said that Nintendo decided that its new Zelda needed a chemistry engine. If physics engines dictate how objects influence the way things move, a chemistry engine could be in charge of how objects change each other’s states.
Basically, Breath of the Wild’s physics engine has three rules:
Elements can change the state of materials. Elements are able to change each other’s states. Materials can not influence each other’s states.
So, fire (an element) can set a tree (a material) on fire. But a tree can’t change the state of another tree. However, water (another element) can put out a fire.
Above: It’s all connected.
Image Credit: GamesBeat
But Zelda lets players get more creative than that. This interaction of elements and objects is one of the keys that makes Breath of the Wild such an interesting game. It lets players experiment and find unique solutions to problems. For example, you could fan a giant leaf at a sail on a boat to move it, or you could throw a sword toward a group of enemies during a storm to attract a lightning bolt in their area.
Dohta admitted that this kind of chemistry isn’t real chemistry. Little of it would scientifically work in the real world. However, a sense of in-game logic dictates the way everything interacts. In real life, a leaf, no matter how big, couldn’t make enough wind to move a sailboat. But in the game, it makes sense once you become familiar with the item’s mechanics.
Nintendo wants people to feel like geniuses when they play Breath of the Wild, and this chemistry engine makes those “ah ha” moments possible.
The Guardian
230 d ago
The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild – tips and tricks they don't tell you
The new Nintendo Switch title offers a vast world to explore, which can be as frustrating as it is magical. Here are some hints for those about to enter HyruleContains spoilers about gameplay, weaponry, cooking and more
Breath of the Wild (BoTW) is a huge game, full of exploration, experimentation and mystery. Like no Zelda title has for decades, it eschews handholding and tutorials in favour of encouraging players to find out how the systems work in their own right.
That can be magical when it works, but if you want to go into the game a bit more prepared, here’s a few of the most useful things to know when setting out to explore Hyrule.
Continue reading...
Mashable
230 d ago
7 'Zelda: Breath of the Wild' tips the game won't tell you about
There's so much you can do in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild that the game never explicitly teaches you.
That points to one of the great delights in this new Zelda: discovering cool stuff. I've spent close to 40 hours playing now and I'm still learning new things about what Link is capable of doing on a regular basis.
SEE ALSO: Nintendo just reinvented 'Zelda' in the best damn way
I'm not here to spoil the fun — or story — for anyone, but if you're just starting out in Breath of the Wild and want some ideas, I've pulled together this short list of things that you might not pick up on so quickly. Read more...
More about The Legend Of Zelda , The Legend Of Zelda Breath Of The Wild , Nintendo , Gaming , and Entertainment
Business Insider
230 d ago
The magnificent new 'Legend of Zelda' game has 2 hidden characters — here's how to get them
There's a lot to love about the new "Legend of Zelda" game — "Breath of the Wild" — for Nintendo's new Switch console. 
It's beautiful, for starters.
But looks are fleeting, and the real joy of "Breath of the Wild" is its incredible sense of wonder and discovery . Simply put, it's an easy game to fall in love with. Spending hours exploring the genuinely dangerous, delightfully varied, hauntingly beautiful regions of Hyrule is a true pleasure.
And it's an even greater pleasure with some old friends by your side.
That's right! Both Wolf Link from "The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess" and Epona from "The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time" are in "Breath of the Wild." But where are they? How do you get them?
We've got answers.
First up, let's start with the obvious one: Wolf Link. Nintendo
The first thing you might notice is that he's adorable. That's because he's adorable. Nintendo
But more importantly, you'll notice that Wolf Link has hearts — a life meter — on the left side of the screen: Nintendo
See the rest of the story at Business Insider
Polygon
230 d ago
See how much better Zelda: Breath of the Wild runs when your Switch is undocked
The difference can be striking
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Polygon
197 d ago
Breath of the Wild guide: The Great Plateau walkthrough
Your first few hours, distilled
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