ARTICLE 83154063 Team Trump Sabotaged Its Own Travel Ban english ARTICLE Stephen Miller told Fox News last month that the new travel ban wasnt much different from the old one. That disclosure might have been a big mistake.
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Team Trump Sabotaged Its Own Travel Ban


The Daily Beast
215 d ago

politics

Stephen Miller told Fox News last month that the new travel ban wasnt much different from the old one. That disclosure might have been a big mistake.
View Full Article On The Daily Beast

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Lawyers are facing off on the order in Maryland, Washington state, and Hawaii, where separate lawsuits have been filed.
The plaintiffs are seeking a temporary restraining order on the ban, which was signed last Monday, weeks after the original order was challenged in courtrooms across the country and ultimately blocked from reinstatement by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.
The revised order no longer bars current visa holders and green card holders from entering the US, and removes Iraq from the list of affected countries, which now include just Iran, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, Libya, and Yemen. It also includes Syrian refugees as part of its 120-day refugee admissions suspension, whereas previously Syrian refugees were barred indefinitely.
Unlike the original order, this ban also gave advanced notice of its implementation, which will occur Thursday at 12:01 a.m. unless one of the judges grants a restraining order.
In Maryland, refugee organizations including the International Refugee Assistance Project called on US District Judge Theodore Chuang to halt Trump’s order. They argued in legal filings that evidence of security threats, which the Trump administration cited as justification for the order, were "implausibly thin," and that the revised order maintained the original ban's "discriminatory intent," according to the Washington Post
"The Executive Order causes severe and irreparable injury to the individual plaintiffs, the organizational plaintiffs, and the organizational plaintiff’s clients, separating family members from one another, stranding people in unsafe locations overseas, and stigmatizing and demeaning one religious group," one legal filing said.
Chuang said Wednesday he will issue a ruling, but could not guarantee it would come before Trump's ban takes effect.
Hawaii had been the first state to file a lawsuit last Wednesday, followed by Washington — which had been the first state to challenge Trump's original ban in January. Washington's renewed lawsuit has been joined by Oregon, Minnesota, Maryland, New York, California, and Massachusetts.
A legal brief filed by California argues that the state's residents — including its more than 10 million immigrants and 150,000 international students — will be harmed by the new ban, according to the  Los Angeles Times . The brief also alleged the state will suffer financial harm, as visitors from the Middle East spent $681 million in the state in 2015, generating $40.8 million in sales tax revenue.
"The Trump Administration may have changed the text of the now-discredited Muslim travel ban, but they didn't change its unconstitutional intent and effect," California's attorney general Xavier Becerra told media on Monday.
"It's still an attack on people — women and children, professors and business colleagues, seniors and civic leaders — based on their religion and national origin."
 
Trump administration officials have defended both bans as necessary in preventing the entry of travelers from countries affected by terrorism, until more rigorous vetting procedures can be implemented.
'Antithetical to Hawaii's State identity and spirit'
Associated Press/Marco GarciaState attorneys for Hawaii argued in their amended complaint that the order will cause "grave injury" to Muslims in Hawaii, and will affect its foreign students and workers and upset the state's tourism-based economy.
"President Trump's new Executive Order is antithetical to Hawaii's State identity and spirit," the complaint argues.
"It is damaging Hawaii's institutions, harming its economy, and eroding Hawaii's sovereign interests in maintaining the separation between church and state as well as in welcoming persons from all nations around the world into the fabric of its society."
The state's attorneys argued that the revised order violates the First Amendment and Fifth Amendment by having the effect and intent of "disfavoring Islam," inflicting harm on Hawaii's residents, discriminating against individuals based on their religion and nationality, and violating individuals of due process rights.
The complaint lists its lead plaintiff as Ismail Elshikh, the Imam of the Muslim Association of Hawaii, whose mother-in-law lives in Syria and could be prevented by the ban from obtaining a visa to visit the state.
The state's lawyers argued that Elshikh and his family will be subjected to "discrimination and second-class treatment."
The complaint also noted that the state hosts 12,000 foreign students and international faculty members, many of whom are from the seven countries identified in Trump's original order, including at least 27 graduate students currently studying at the University of Hawaii.
Foreign students paid more than $400 million into the Hawaiian economy through their tuition, fees, and living expenses, and supported 7,590 jobs and generated more than $43 million in state taxes, the complaint said.
The lawyers also argued that tourism is Hawaii's "lead economic driver," bringing in 8.7 million visitors in 2015 alone, who accounted for $15 billion in spending.
'Nationality- and religion-based discrimination'
Reuters/Carlos BarriaHawaii's complaint, like those against Trump's first order, uses in its arguments previous statements Trump has made, such as those calling for "a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States" and accusing the American immigration system of "importing radical Islamic terrorism to the West."
"President Trump repeatedly campaigned on the promise that he would ban Muslim immigrants and refugees from entering the United States, particularly from Syria, and maintained the same rhetoric after he was elected," the complaint said.
The lawyers also included in the complaint several comments made by Trump allies that appear to call into question the intent of Trump's order. The complaint cites comments made by former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who told Fox News that Trump had consulted him on how to legally implement a "Muslim ban."
Also cited is Trump's senior adviser Stephen Miller, who told Fox News last month that Trump's revised order would have the same effect as the original one.
The lawsuit also sought to undercut Trump's claims that the order was urgently needed to prevent terrorist attacks. The suit referred to a recent report that found that no fatal terrorist attack in the US since 1975 was perpetrated by a national of one of the six countries.
It also referred to a draft Homeland Security report published by the Associated Press that found that citizenship was an "unlikely indicator" of terrorism threats against the US, and that half of the 82 people inspired by a foreign terrorist group to attempt or carry out a terrorist attack in the US were citizens who had been born in the country.
"Defendants have exceeded their statutory authority, engaged in nationality- and religion-based discrimination, and failed to vindicate statutory rights guaranteed by the Immigration and Nationality Act," the lawyers argued.
"The Executive Order purports to protect the country from terrorism, but sweeps in millions of people who have absolutely no connection to terrorism."
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Senator Elizabeth Warren says the latest block to the administration’s travel ban(s) means it’s “0 for 2 vs the constitution”:
Turns out, an illegal Muslim ban by another name is still an illegal Muslim ban. So the courts just blocked @realDonaldTrump 's second one.
. @realDonaldTrump , your Muslim ban is now 0 for 2 vs the Constitution. Stop fighting the rule of law and start fighting for all Americans.
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The revised order temporarily bars entry to the United States of most refugees as well as travelers from six Muslim-majority countries. The Republican president has said the policy is critical for national security.
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Trump signed the first order a week after his Jan. 20 inauguration. It temporarily banned travelers from seven mostly Muslim countries in addition to most refugees and took effect immediately, causing chaos and protests at airports across the country and around the globe.
After the ban was targeted by more than two dozen lawsuits arguing it discriminated against Muslims and violated the US Constitution, it was struck down by a federal judge in Seattle in a ruling upheld by a US appeals court.
The White House went back to the drawing board and narrowed its scope.
The new order bars citizens of Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen from entering the country for 90 days, but Iraq is no longer on the list. Refugees are still barred for 120 days, but an indefinite ban on all refugees from Syria was dropped.
The revised ban also excludes legal permanent residents and existing visa holders. It provides a series of waivers for various categories of immigrants with ties to the United States. The government has maintained in court that the changes resolve any legal issues with the original order.
Kate Munsch/Reuters
Prove harm
Three cases against the new ban moved forward on Wednesday.
In Maryland, refugee resettlement agencies represented by the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Immigration Law Center argued in court for a restraining order.
Separately, Hawaii's attorney general sued, arguing the states' universities and tourist economy would be harmed by the travel restrictions and also asked that the law be enjoined.
In Washington state, a group of plaintiffs applying for immigrant visas asked US District Judge James Robart in Seattle - who suspended the first ban - to stop the new order.
Washington state, joined by California, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York and Oregon, said in court filings they supported the plaintiffs in Seattle.
To move forward with the lawsuits, the states and groups have to prove harm, or "standing," which some legal experts have said is difficult to prove because of all the exemptions and waivers in the new order.
The government says the new order only applies to people outside the United States who have not entered the country and do not have constitutional rights.
"Who has the standing in this case if anyone?" US District Judge Derrick Watson asked Hawaii's attorneys.
A group of 58 tech companies, including Airbnb, Lyft and Dropbox, filed a "friend of the court' brief in the case saying the order hurt their ability to recruit the best talent from around the world. A longer list of companies - that included giants like Apple, Facebook and Google - filed a brief opposing the first ban in a different court challenge brought by Washington state, which is ongoing.
At the court hearing in Greenbelt, Maryland, on Wednesday US District Judge Theodore Chuang pushed on the question of who would be harmed by the order. Chuang said he would try to issue a written ruling on Wednesday, before the order is implemented, but said it might come afterward.
REUTERS/Kate Munsch
Muslim ban?
Detractors say the intent behind both Trump's first and second orders was to discriminate against Muslims.
Colleen Sinzdak arguing at the Honolulu hearing for the state of Hawaii said there was "more than ample evidence this ban was motivated by religious animus." She pointed to Trump's promise during his election campaign of "a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States."
The Trump administration has disputed that allegation, saying many Muslim-majority countries are not included in the ban.
The text of the order does not mention Islam and the government has said the courts should only look at the actual document, not outside comments by Trump or his aides.
The judge at the Hawaii hearing said the language of the new order did not give "any particular religious feeling or connotation."
If the new ban goes ahead, advocacy groups said lawyers would head again to international airports to assist anyone who might be improperly detained or prevented from entering, said Betsy Fisher, the policy director at the International Refugee Assistance Project.
Since the order included a 10-day lag before taking effect, far fewer people are likely to be caught out while traveling.
"There are going to be attorneys on the ground and ready to respond," Fisher said in a telephone interview. "But we're anticipating not seeing the same kind of chaos because there was an announcement in advance."
(Reporting by Dan Levine in Honolulu and Ian Simpson in Greenbelt, Md. Additional reporting by Mica Rosenberg and Jonathan Allen in New York; Writing by Mica Rosenberg; Editing by Sue Horton and Peter Cooney)
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Fox News
214 d ago
Federal judge in Hawaii halts Trump travel ban
President Trump's revised travel ban was put on hold Wednesday by a federal judge in Hawaii just hours before it was set to take effect after hearing arguments that the executive order discriminates on the basis of nationality.
CNN
214 d ago
Federal judge halts Trump's new travel ban
A federal judge in Hawaii granted a temporary restraining order blocking key provisions of President Donald Trump's new travel ban, meaning travelers from six Muslim-majority countries and refugees will be able to travel to the US.
Reuters
214 d ago
Trump calls court decision blocking revised travel ban 'judicial overreach'
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump said a decision by a U.S. federal judge in Hawaii to issue an emergency halt on Wednesday to his revised travel ban was an example of "unprecedented judicial overreach."
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ABC
214 d ago
Trump calls ruling against new travel ban 'unprecedented judicial overreach'
"This ruling makes us look weak," Trump said at a Nashville rally.
Fox News
214 d ago
Trump lashes out at latest travel ban ruling: 'It makes us look weak!'
President Trump slammed a Hawaii federal judge who halted his revised travel ban from going into effect Thursday, saying the ruling was "unprecedented judicial overreach."
Business Insider
214 d ago
Trump called his now-blocked revised travel ban a 'watered down' version of the original
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images
President Donald Trump confirmed the precise reason why his new travel ban was blocked on Wednesday.
During a campaign-style speech in Nashville, Tennessee, Trump railed against a Hawaii federal judge who put his revised travel ban on hold. The new executive order was set to take effect on Thursday.
"The order he blocked was a watered down version of the first order that was also blocked by another judge and should have never been blocked to start with," Trump told the crowd.
Those words were seen as problematic, since the US Justice Department is tasked with defending the president's executive order in court.
Trump's wording is nearly identical to what critics challenging the ban have said, noting that Trump's new executive order did not do enough to address the constitutional concerns of Trump's first action on immigration. One of the most prominent changes in the order removed Iraq from the list of majority-Muslim countries from which travel to the US would be restricted.
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said of Trump's new executive order last week : "A watered-down ban is still a ban." Schumer added: "Despite the administration’s changes, this dangerous executive order makes us less safe, not more; it is mean-spirited, and un-American. It must be repealed."
"The ruling makes us look weak," Trump said during his Nashville speech.
California's attorney general Xavier Becerra sounded off the revised ban on Monday, saying "The Trump Administration may have changed the text of the now-discredited Muslim travel ban, but they didn't change its unconstitutional intent and effect."
"It's still an attack on people — women and children, professors and business colleagues, seniors and civic leaders — based on their religion and national origin."
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USA Today
215 d ago
Trump blasts judge's travel ban ruling in Nashville speech
President Trump touted his first 60 days in office as the most productive ever for a president and compared himself to President Andrew Jack...
         
 
 
CNBC
214 d ago
Apple, Google, Facebook skip legal challenge to new Trump travel ban
More than 60 tech companies, including Apple, Google and Facebook, appear to have backed away from a legal fight against Trump's travel ban order.
Business Insider
214 d ago
The Trump team's own statements may keep hampering their travel ban efforts
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
As President Donald Trump seeks to implement a version of his travel ban targeting some majority Muslim countries, his team's past statements on the matter may keep coming back to haunt him.
US District Judge Derrick Watson put an emergency stop on Trump's revised travel ban on Wednesday — just hours before it was scheduled to go into effect.
In his opinion, Watson centers on the historical background and the context of the executive order. "The record before this Court is unique," said Watson in his opinion. "It includes significant and unrebutted evidence of religious animus driving the promulgation of the Executive Order and its related predecessor."
"The illogic of the Government’s contentions is palpable," Watso added.
He offered the following example from CNN's television broadcast of an interview between Anderson Cooper and Trump last year:
"In March 2016, Mr. Trump said, during an interview, 'I think Islam hates us.' Mr. Trump was asked, 'Is there a war between the West and radical Islam, or between the West and Islam itself?'
He replied: 'It’s very hard to separate. Because you don’t know who’s who.'
In that same interview, Mr. Trump stated: 'But there’s a tremendous hatred. And we have to be very vigilant. We have to be very careful. And we can’t allow people coming into this country who have this hatred of the United States. . . [a]nd of people that are not Muslim.'"
The judge included an excerpt from an interview with NBC's Meet the Press from October the same year:
"Your running mate said this week that the Muslim ban is no longer your position. Is that correct? And if it is, was it a mistake to have a religious test?”
Mr. Trump replied: “The Muslim ban is something that in some form has morphed into a[n] extreme vetting from certain areas of the world.” When asked to clarify whether “the Muslim ban still stands,” Mr. Trump said, “It’s called extreme vetting.”
Mark Wilson/Getty Images
In response to the revised travel ban that replaced the first executive order — which was slapped down by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in February — Watson argued in his ruling that the White House intended to prioritize religion above secularism with its travel ban, citing statements from an adviser to Trump:
"... the President’s Senior Adviser, Stephen Miller, stated, 'Fundamentally ... you’re still going to have the same basic policy outcome [as the first].'
These plainly-worded statements, in many cases, made by the Executive himself, betray the Executive Order’s stated secular purpose.
Any reasonable, objective observer would conclude, as does the Court ... that the stated secular purpose of the Executive Order is, at the very least, 'secondary to a religious objective' of temporarily suspending the entry of Muslims."
Advocacy groups like the American Civil Liberties Union echoed Judge Watson's sentiments in a statement released after the ruling:
"We are pleased but not surprised by this latest development and will continue working to ensure the Muslim ban never takes effect," the ACLU tweeted , moments after the verdict.
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The Guardian
214 d ago
Hawaii judge halts new Trump travel ban, setting stage for epic legal battle
A livid Trump said he would take his case to the supreme court if necessary, as a temporary restraining order halted the ban just hours before it came into effect
Donald Trump appears set on a collision course with federal judges, vowing to fight them to the end after a district court in Hawaii issued the second block in as many months on his proposed travel ban on visitors from Muslim-majority countries.
The dramatic clashes between Trump and the judiciary came just hours before the president’s revised executive order was due to come into effect at midnight. Had it stood, the travel ban would have put a complete stop to arrivals of refugees from anywhere in the world as well as newcomers from six predominantly Muslim countries. Continue reading...
CNN
214 d ago
Attorney General Chin supports travel ban halt
CNN's John Vause and Isha Sesay talk to Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin about the federal judge who blocked President Donald Trump's new travel ban hours before the ban was set to go into effect.
The Guardian
214 d ago
Loose talk came back to haunt Trump in judge's travel ban ruling | Austin Sarat
Hawaii judge’s insistence that Trump’s talk of banning Muslims must be taken literally is a reminder of the enduring power of language
Federal judge in Hawaii blocks revised Trump travel ban nationwide
For months, critics of the president have been told that they should take Trump’s words seriously, but not literally.
On Wednesday night federal district judge Derrick K Watson refused to take the bait. He insisted that Trump’s words on “banning Muslims” should be taken seriously and literally.
Continue reading...
CNN
214 d ago
Trump's ban blocked: What you need to know
Just hours before it was due to go into effect, US President Donald Trump's revised executive order banning travelers from six Muslim-majority nations was struck down by a federal court in Hawaii late Wednesday.
CNN
214 d ago
Fiery debate on Trump's travel ban
A federal judge in Hawaii blocked President Donald Trump's new travel ban, hours before the ban was set to go into effect. CNN Tonight panel discusses the ruling.
Reuters
214 d ago
Trump vows to appeal against travel ban ruling to Supreme Court
HONOLULU/NEW YORK (Reuters) - A defiant Donald Trump has pledged to appeal against a federal judge's order placing an immediate halt on his revised travel ban, describing the ruling as judicial overreach that made the United States look weak.
CNBC
214 d ago
Trump vows to appeal against travel ban ruling to Supreme Court
Donald Trump has pledged to appeal against a federal judge's order placing an immediate halt on his revised travel ban.
Business Insider
214 d ago
Trump vows to take his travel ban 'as far as it needs to go' — including the Supreme Court
REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
HONOLULU/NEW YORK — A defiant President Donald Trump has pledged to appeal against a federal judge's order placing an immediate halt on his revised travel ban, describing the ruling as judicial overreach that made the US look weak.
In granting the temporary restraining order in response to a lawsuit by the state of Hawaii, US District Judge Derrick Watson found on Wednesday that "a reasonable, objective observer ... would conclude that the executive order was issued with a purpose to disfavor a particular religion."
Early on Thursday, US District Judge Theodore Chuang issued a nationwide preliminary injunction in a similar case in Maryland brought by refugee-resettlement agencies represented by the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Immigration Law Center.
Chuang ruled that the agencies were likely to succeed in proving that the travel-ban portion of the executive order was intended to be a ban on Muslims and, as a result, violates the US Constitution's religious-freedom protection.
"To avoid sowing seeds of division in our nation, upholding this fundamental constitutional principle at the core of our nation's identity plainly serves a significant public interest," Chuang wrote in his ruling.
The actions were the latest legal blow to the administration's efforts to temporarily bar refugees as well as travelers from six predominantly Muslim countries. The president has said the ban is needed for national security.
The orders, however, while a victory for the plaintiffs, are only a first step, and the government could win its underlying case. Watson and Chuang were appointed to the bench by Democratic President Barack Obama.
Trump, speaking after the Hawaii ruling at a rally in Nashville, called his revised executive order a "watered-down version" of his first.
The president said he would take the case "as far as it needs to go," including to the Supreme Court, to get a ruling that the ban is legal.
The most likely next stop if the administration decides to contest the Hawaii judge's ruling would be the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.
Three judges on the Ninth Circuit upheld a restraining order on the first travel ban issued by a Washington state judge.
At that point, the government's legal options were to ask for a hearing by a larger panel of judges or petition the Supreme Court to hear the case. Instead, the administration withdrew the ban, promising to retool it in ways that would address the legal issues.
REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
If the Ninth Circuit were to uphold the Hawaii court's ruling, an appeal to the Supreme Court would be complicated by its current makeup of four conservative and four liberal judges, with no ninth justice since the death of Antonin Scalia more than a year ago.
The travel ban has deeply divided the country on liberal and conservative lines, and it is unlikely that a ninth Supreme Court justice would be seated in time to hear an appeal in this case.
Trump signed the new ban March 6 in a bid to overcome legal problems with his January executive order, which caused chaos at airports and sparked mass protests before a Washington judge stopped its enforcement in February.
Watson's order is only temporary until the broader arguments in the case can be heard. He set an expedited hearing schedule to determine whether his ruling should be extended.
Trump's first travel order was more sweeping than the second revised order. Like the current one, it barred citizens of Iran, Libya, Syria, Somalia, Sudan, and Yemen from entering the US for 90 days, but it also included Iraq, which was subsequently taken off the list.
The revised ban also excluded legal permanent residents and existing visa holders and provided waivers for various categories of immigrants with ties to the US.
Hawaii and other opponents of the ban claimed that the motivation behind it was Trump's campaign promise of "a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States."
In Washington state, a group of plaintiffs applying for immigrant visas asked US District Judge James Robart in Seattle — who suspended the first ban — to stop the new order. Robart was appointed to the bench by former Republican President George W. Bush.
Robart said he would issue a written ruling but did not specify a time line.
(Reporting by Dan Levine in Honolulu, Mica Rosenberg in New York and Brendan O'Brien in Milwaukee; Writing by Dan Whitcomb in Los Angeles; Editing by Toby Chopra)
Re/code
214 d ago
Recode Daily: Hawaii judge vs. Trump’s travel ban II
Plus Trump’s first budget proposal — and his first federal interest rate hike.
A federal judge in Hawaii blocked President Trump’s revised travel ban, hours before it was to take effect. U.S. District Judge Derrick K. Watson, citing Trump’s own public comments, declared that the executive order was “issued with a purpose to disfavor a particular religion.” [ Dara Lind / Vox ]
Trump is expected to release a budget proposal today that includes deep cuts for the State Department and Environmental Protection Agency as his administration seeks to raise military spending. [ Glenn Thrush and Coral Davenport / The New York Times ]
The Federal Reserve raised interest rates. It's the third time it has raised the benchmark interest rate since the financial crisis of 2008, and a sign that job growth is healthier. [ Binyamin Applebaum / The New York Times ]
Two Russian spies are behind the 2014 Yahoo data breach, the Department of Justice says. The DOJ also charged two other hackers with the theft of 500 million Yahoo users’ account information — one of the largest breaches in history. [ April Glaser / Recode ]
Glenn Beck says taking on Trump has probably cost him listeners. But “I say this with all humility: I don’t care,” Beck told Peter Kafka during a live taping of the Recode Media podcast at SXSW in Austin last week. [ Eric Johnson / Recode ]
Marc Andreessen, Reed Hastings and Cecile Richards — you know them as the leaders of Andreessen Horowitz, Netflix and Planned Parenthood, respectively — have signed on to the impressive lineup of speakers being assembled for Recode's signature event, Code Conference, coming up in May. [ Peter Kafka / Recode ]
Top stories from Recode
Tesla is looking to raise $1 billion in stock and debt
The company is offering $250 million in common stock and $750 million in convertible notes.
Meet Fortune’s new editor, Clifton Leaf
Questions for the new boss: How do you cover Trump? And what’s going to happen if Time Inc. has new owners?
Walmart is acquiring ModCloth, the online women’s fashion retailer
This is Walmart's latest attempt to boost Jet.com’s business.
One of Uber’s top self-driving engineers, Raffi Krikorian, is stepping down
Krikorian joined Uber after more than five years at Twitter to head up the company’s Pittsburgh headquarters.
Amazon is courting Alexa developers with free AWS service
Most Alexa developers incur costs, but don’t have a way to make money.
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Super Cali bloom
While many of you are still blanketed in white, California is experiencing a blizzard of color, a once-in-a-decade explosion of desert wildflowers, the aftereffect of long-waited-for rains in the drought-stricken area. Soak up these photos, remember that color will return and meanwhile, make ice cream out of snow . ( via Curbed Los Angeles )
USA Today
214 d ago
Trump travel ban dealt another blow by Maryland judge
The Maryland decision follows a ruling by a federal judge in Hawaii on Wednesday.
         
 
 
Fox News
214 d ago
Republican-appointed judges on 9th Circuit voice support for Trump travel ban
Five judges on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals have broken ranks with their colleagues and voiced support for the legality of President Trump’s original travel ban.
CNBC
214 d ago
Trump’s own allies helped a judge block his travel ban
TV appearances by Trump allies wound up working against him in Judge Derrick K. Watson's restraining order, Vox reports.
The Economist
214 d ago
A judge blocks Donald Trump’s revised travel ban
JUST hours before it was set to go into effect at the stroke of midnight on March 16th, Donald Trump’s second try at an executive order to pause travel from several Muslim-majority countries was batted down by a federal district court in Hawaii. Judge Derrick Watson, nominated to the bench by Barack Obama and confirmed unanimously by the Senate in 2013, was unimpressed with Mr Trump’s attempt to immunise his revised ban from its illicit discriminatory origin. The 43-page order did not mince words. “The illogic of the Government’s contentions”, Mr Watson wrote, “is palpable”.
The judge began by noting that the new ban differed in certain respects from the first. Travel restrictions on America’s lawful permanent residents and on people already holding visas abroad were lifted. Language suggesting that Christian refugees would be favoured over Muslims was deleted. And Iraq was removed from the list of banned countries, leaving six: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. But Mr Watson wrote that the plaintiffs made a good case for their claim that the heart of Mr Trump’s order—a 90-day suspension of all travel from those countries, and a 120-day pause on the entry of new... Continue reading
Business Insider
214 d ago
Apple, Google, Facebook, and Netflix back away from fighting Trump's new travel ban in court
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Apple, Google and Facebook are among more than 60 technology companies that appear to have backed away from the legal fight against U.S. President Donald Trump's controversial travel ban, deciding not to put their weight behind a lawsuit seeking to block the second version of his executive order.
A legal brief filed in federal court in Hawaii on Tuesday on behalf of Silicon Valley companies listed the support of 58 companies, less than half the 127 signatories to a similar brief filed in an appeals court last month after Trump's first executive order banning travel from a number of countries the administration said posed a security risk.
Airbnb, Dropbox and Kickstarter are among the companies that did sign the brief.
Major tech companies that signed on to the earlier effort but not this week included Microsoft, eBay, Intel, Netflix and Twitter.
The lawsuit may succeed despite losing the overt support of such big names. U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson in Honolulu on Wednesday ordered an emergency halt to Trump's executive order that aimed to temporarily bar entry to the United States of most refugees as well as travelers from six Muslim-majority countries. The halt is temporary.
Trump says the ban is necessary for U.S. national security, and called Watson's order "unprecedented judicial overreach."
Tech companies, which generally rely on skilled workers from overseas more than other industries, played a large part in the legal effort to halt the first version of Trump's executive order, which was put on hold by a Seattle judge in early February.
It was not immediately clear why fewer of them signed on to the "friend-of-the-court" brief this time around.
Companies will have an opportunity to join the effort as it moves through the court system, said Robert Atkins, a New York lawyer and co-author of the brief. "We do expect the group to expand."
Ride-hailing company Uber Technologies Inc was in the process of adding its name, a spokesman said.
Box Inc, a file-sharing service, said that although it did not sign the brief, there had been no change to its position.
A Twitter spokeswoman pointed to past company statements opposing Trump's initial travel ban in January but declined to comment further. A spokeswoman for Facebook declined to comment.
Representatives of Apple, Google, eBay, Intel, Microsoft and Netflix did not immediately respond to requests for comment. 
NOW WATCH: What happens to your brain and body if you use Adderall recreationally
The New Yorker
214 d ago
Trump Breaks World Record for Unconstitutional Travel Bans
WASHINGTON ( The Borowitz Report )—Notching the first major achievement of his Presidency, Donald Trump has broken the world record for unconstitutional travel bans, the White House confirmed on Wednesday.
See the rest of the story at newyorker.com
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214 d ago
Federal judges have blocked Trump's revised travel ban — here's how many refugees have entered the US during his presidency
Federal judges blocked President Trump's revised travel ban. The ruling was the second time Trump's travel ban was blocked by a federal judge, dealing a blow to one of the president's biggest campaign promises. The revised travel ban would have shut down the US refugee program for 120 days and barred citizens from six majority-Muslim nations. Here's how many refugees have entered the US during Trump's first seven weeks. 
New York Times
214 d ago
Who Undercut President Trump’s Travel Ban? Candidate Trump
Mr. Trump’s angry, often xenophobic rallying cries during the campaign have become legal and political liabilities now that he is in the Oval Office.
USA Today
214 d ago
What's next for Trump's revised travel ban?
Trump lawyers may slow down an appeal to get his Supreme Court nominee on the bench.
         
 
 
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