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Winners and losers in Trump's budget blueprint


Fox News
156 d ago

867cf776-b22a-43ee-ac85-18c297d07cc1 fox-news politics executive budgets fox news fnc article foxnews.com cody derespina

Of the 15 Cabinet agencies listed in President Trump’s “America First” budget blueprint, only a sliver are seeing any increases over their 2017 levels.
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Trump's first budget will anger both Democrats and Republicans
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WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is unveiling a $1.15 trillion budget, a far-reaching overhaul of federal government spending that slashes a dozen departments to finance a significant increase in the military and make a down payment on a US-Mexico border wall.
Thursday's scheduled budget release will upend Washington with cuts to long-promised campaign targets like foreign aid and the Environmental Protection Agency as well as strong congressional favorites such as medical research, help for homeless veterans, and community-development grants.
"A budget that puts America first must make the safety of our people its number one priority — because without safety, there can be no prosperity," Trump said in a message accompanying his proposed budget that was titled "America First: A Budget Blueprint to Make America Great Again."
The $54 billion boost for the military is the largest since President Ronald Reagan's Pentagon buildup in the 1980s, promising immediate money for troop readiness, the fight against Islamic State militants, and procurement of new ships, fighter jets, and other weapons. The 10% Pentagon boost is financed by $54 billion in cuts to foreign aid and domestic agencies that had been protected by President Barack Obama.
The budget goes after the frequent targets of the party's staunchest conservatives, eliminating the National Endowment for the Arts, legal aid for the poor, low-income heating assistance, and the AmeriCorps national service program established by President Bill Clinton.
Such programs were the focus of lengthy battles dating to the GOP takeover of Congress in 1995 and have survived prior attempts to eliminate them. Lawmakers will have the final say on Trump's proposal in the arduous budget process.
The budget is set for official release Thursday morning, but The Associated Press and other news outlets obtained the document in advance.
Law-enforcement agencies like the FBI would be spared, while the border wall would receive an immediate $1.5 billion infusion in the ongoing fiscal year, with another $2.6 billion planned for the 2018 budget year starting October 1.
Trump repeatedly claimed during the campaign that Mexico would pay for the wall when, in fact, US taxpayers will foot the bill.
Twelve of the government's 15 Cabinet agencies would absorb cuts under the president's proposal. The biggest losers are Agriculture, Labor, State, and the Cabinet-level EPA. The Defense Department, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Department of Veterans Affairs are the winners.
More than 3,000 EPA workers would lose their jobs, and programs such as Obama's Clean Power Plan, which would tighten regulations on emissions from power plants seen as contributing to global warming, would be eliminated. Popular EPA grants for state and local drinking and wastewater projects would be preserved, however.
Trump's proposal covers only roughly one-fourth of the approximately $4 trillion federal budget, the discretionary portion that Congress passes each year. It doesn't address taxes, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, or make predictions about deficits and the economy. Those big-picture details are due in mid-May and are sure to show large — probably permanent — budget deficits. Trump has vowed not to cut Social Security and Medicare and is dead set against raising taxes.
"The president's going to keep his promises" to leave Social Security and Medicare alone, the White House budget director, Mick Mulvaney, said.
REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Trump's proposal is sure to land with a thud on Capitol Hill — and not just with opposition Democrats outraged over cuts to pet programs such as renewable energy, climate-change research, and rehabilitation of housing projects.
Republicans like Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio are irate over planned elimination of a program to restore the Great Lakes. Top Republicans like Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker of Tennessee are opposed to drastic cuts to foreign aid. And even GOP defense hawks like Armed Services Committee Chairman Mac Thornberry of Texas aren't satisfied with the $54 billion increase for the military.
Before the two sides go to war over Trump's 2018 plan, they need to clean up more than $1.1 trillion in unfinished agency budgets for the current year. A temporary catchall spending bill expires April 28; negotiations have barely started and could get hung up over Trump's request for the wall and additional border-patrol and immigration-enforcement agents, just for starters.
Some of the most politically sensitive domestic programs would be spared, including food aid for pregnant women and their children, housing vouchers for the poor, aid for special education and school districts for the poor, and federal aid to historically black colleges and universities.
But the National Institutes of Health would absorb a $5.8 billion cut despite Trump's talk in a recent address to Congress of finding "cures to the illnesses that have always plagued us." Subsidies for airlines serving rural airports in Trump strongholds would be eliminated. Also zeroed out would be funding for subsidies of Amtrak's money-losing long-distance routes and a $500-million-a-year "TIGER Grant" program for highway projects created by Obama.
In a blow to endangered GOP Sen. Dean Heller of Nevada, Trump's budget seeks $120 million to revive the mothballed Yucca Mountain nuclear-waste repository, which is hugely unpopular in his state and was largely killed by the efforts of Harry Reid, the former Democratic senator. Heller is up for reelection next year in a state that backed Democrat Hillary Clinton.
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156 d ago
Here are the winners and losers in Trump's first budget plan
REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
WASHINGTON — Military spending would get the biggest boost in President Donald Trump's proposed budget. Environmental programs, medical research, Amtrak and an array of international and cultural programs — from Africa to Appalachia — would take big hits, among the many parts of the government he'd put on a crash diet.
The budget proposal out Thursday is a White House wish list; it'll be up to Congress to decide where money goes. If Trump gets his way, there will be more losers than winners among government departments and programs.
Some programs would tread water: WIC grants — money to states for health care and nutrition for low-income women, infants and children — are one example. Money for states' grants for water infrastructure projects would be held level as well.
Some others would lose everything: Trump proposes to eliminate money for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the national endowments for arts and humanities, and more than a dozen other independent agencies financed by the government.
A sampling:
Winners:
—The Pentagon. Trump proposes a 10 percent increase in the massive defense budget, adding $52 billion in military spending in one year to expand personnel, equipment and capability. Another $2 billion would go to nuclear weapons.
—Veterans Affairs. Up 5.9 percent. That's an additional $4.4 billion, driven by ever-increasing health care costs.
—Homeland Security. Up 6.8 percent, or $2.8 billion more. Most of the increase, $2.6 billion, would be to help kick-start Trump's promised border wall. The president has repeatedly said Mexico would pay for the wall; Mexican officials are adamant that they won't. Trump also wants an extra $1.5 billion for more immigration jails and deportations, and $314 million to hire 1,500 immigration enforcement and border patrol agents.
—The National Nuclear Security Administration, which oversees the maintenance and safety of the nuclear arsenal and its research labs. The agency would grow by 11.3 percent, or $1.4 billion, so that it takes up more than half the Energy Department's budget, which would shrink overall.
—Opioid prevention and treatment. The proposal includes a $500 million increase in the Health and Human Services Department to counter the epidemic and more money for the Justice Department to combat the problem.
—School choice. The proposal includes $1.4 billion more to expand school-choice programs, bringing spending in that area to $20 billion, even as the Education Department's overall budget would be cut by $9 billion, or 13 percent.
REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Losers:
—The Environmental Protection Agency. It faces a 31.4 percent cut, or $2.6 billion. The plan would cut 3,200 jobs at the agency, eliminate a new plan for tighter regulations on power plants, and "zero out" programs to clean up the Great Lakes and the Chesapeake Bay.
—Health and Human Services. It faces the largest cut in dollar terms: $12.6 billion, or 16.2 percent. The plan would cut $5.8 billion from the nearly $32 billion National Institutes of Health, the nation's premier medical research agency, bringing its total to $25.9 billion. It's not clear what research on diseases or disorders would lose the most money, although the budget plan specifically calls for the elimination of a division that focuses on global health. Already, the NIH's budget hasn't kept pace with inflation over the last decade, making it dramatically harder for scientists around the country to win money for research projects into potential new treatments or better understanding of disease.
—State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development. Down 28 percent, or $10 billion. Foreign aid would be reduced, as would money to the U.N. and to multilateral development banks including the World Bank. Some foreign military grants would be shifted to loans.
—Labor Department. A more than 20 percent cut, or $2.5 billion. To be eliminated: a $434 million program that has helped more than 1 million people 55 and older find jobs, according to the department. The blueprint says the Senior Community Service Employment Program is inefficient.
—Agriculture Department. A nearly 21 percent cut, or $4.7 billion, achieved in part by cutting land acquisition in the National Forest System, rural water infrastructure, and statistical capabilities at the department. Trump also proposes a reduction in staff in county USDA offices, an idea that fell flat in Congress when President Barack Obama proposed a similar reduction.
—Transportation Department. Trump proposes a cut of nearly 13 percent, or $2.4 billion. Amtrak, local transit agencies, and rural communities that depend on federal subsidies to obtain scheduled airline service would take the brunt. Trump would eliminate subsidies for Amtrak long-distance train routes, which would most likely mean the end of those routes since they are generally not profitable. Money for the Federal Transit Administration grant program for new light rail and subway construction would be eliminated except for multiyear projects the government has already committed to help fund.
—Internal Revenue Service. After years of cuts, the IRS budget would be cut again — by $239 million from this year's spending levels. The IRS budget is down about $1 billion from its height in 2010. Since then, the agency has lost more than 17,000 employees. As a result, the chances of getting audited have rarely been so low.
—Commerce Department. A 16 percent or $1.5 billion cut. The plan would eliminate more than $250 million in National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration grants, including a program that helps coastal communities adapt to climate change, deal with invasive species and maintain healthy water and fisheries. Also on the chopping block: the Economic Development Administration, which provides federal dollars to foster job creation and attract private investment; and the Minority Business Development Agency, which is dedicated to helping minority-owned business get off the ground and grow. The Trump administration says the two agencies duplicate work done elsewhere.
—School programs. The plan would eliminate a $1.2 billion initiative that supports before- and after-school programs, as well as summer programs.
—Independent agencies supported by tax dollars. If Trump prevails, a hefty contingent of entities will lose all federal money and be shut. Among them are the Public Broadcasting Corporation, the Appalachian Regional Commission, the Chemical Safety Board, the United States Institute of Peace, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Corporation for National Community Service, and the African Development Foundation. That foundation was established by Congress and provides seed money and other support to enterprises in some 20 countries on that continent.
___
Associated Press writers Andrew Taylor, Lauran Neergaard, Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Stephen Ohlemacher, Joan Lowy, Laurie Kellman, Mary Clare Jalonick, Kevin Freking, Alicia A. Caldwell and Evan Berland contributed to this report.
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Enlarge / NASHVILLE, TN - MARCH 15: President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on March 15, 2017 in Nashville, Tennessee. (credit: Getty Images)
Yesterday, the Trump administration released its first proposed budget outline . While this is just the first step in what will inevitably be extensive negotiations with Congress, it gives a clear indication of what Trump's priorities are. First and foremost, he is focused on the military, which will see a $54 billion increase in spending, offset by cuts or wholesale elimination of programs elsewhere. Science is clearly not a priority, as it is repeatedly targeted for cuts in every agency that funds it.
But those cuts aren't evenly distributed. NASA's budget is almost entirely unscathed, although Earth sciences research funded by the agency will be cut to expand funding elsewhere. The National Science Foundation, a major source of grants for fundamental research, isn't even mentioned, so there's no sense of how it will fare. And the harshest cuts appear to be directed at biomedical research, which will see a dramatic 20 percent drop in funding for the National Institutes of Health.
NIH hammered
For fiscal year 2018, the president's budget calls for a $15.1 billion cut to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), a decrease of almost 18 percent. The proposed cuts to NIH would see the research agency lose $5.8 billion, dropping its budget from $31 billion to just $25.9 billion. Structural changes make the effective cuts closer to $6.3 billion, or over 20 percent. That would mean the smallest biomedical science budget since 2002 . The real-world impact would be far greater, as biomedical research costs are increasing much faster than the rate of inflation.
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155 d ago
NASA may take a $400 million hit under Trump's proposed budget
NASA; Getty; Business Insider
A budget proposed by the Trump administration, if accepted, may represent a hit of nearly half a billion dollars to NASA's future funding.
The White House document , which covers discretionary spending (about 27% of the national budget), calls for a $200 million decrease for the space agency, for a total of $19.1 billion.
This represents about a 1% hit to NASA's current funding level of $19.3 billion per year.
President Trump's proposal would also steamroll a 1% budget increase that's part of the NASA Transition Authorization Act of 2017 . That bill — the first major revision of the space agency's funding and mission passed by both the House and Senate in nearly 7 years — endeavors to give NASA some $19.508 billion.
This makes the discrepancy between what the White House and Congress is proposing for NASA's future funding more than $400 million.
Over the past year or two, presidents have been less generous than Congress with NASA's budget. For instance, former President Obama in 2016 requested the space agency receive $19 billion, a difference of $300 million compared to congressional plans. Congress mostly rejected Obama's budget, giving NASA $19.3 billion.
In Trump's newly proposed budget, NASA's Earth science program — a decades-old foundation of the space agency that helps predict weather forecasts, warnings, and long-term climate shifts — would take a $102 million cut compared to actual 2017 funding levels.
Specifically, the president hopes to terminate the Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE), Orbital Carbon Observatory-3 (OCO-3), Deep Space Climate Observatory (DISCOVR), and CLARREO Pathfinder missions.
These four satellites allow scientists to monitor and predict the behavior of Earth's weather, shifting climates, ocean ecosystems, and other vital aspects of our planet. They help save peoples' lives, protect wildlife, and prepare America and other nations for long-term changes.
NASA's Office of Education may also be axed to save $115 million a year. That program is designed to attract and retain "students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, disciplines" among other goals, according to NASA .
NASA's Marshall Spaceflight Center
About $3.7 billion of funding is proposed for NASA's crewed exploration of deep space — ostensibly the moon and Mars — using a giant upcoming rocket, called the Space Launch System , and its Orion spaceship.
It also sets aside $1.9 billion a year for planetary science, making for an increase of about 20% compared to what Obama requested for 2017, according to The Planetary Society .
The budget also calls for NASA to launch Mars 2020, a nuclear-powered rover designed to search for signs of ancient life on Mars, and the Europa Clipper, a probe that'd study Europa — Jupiter's largest icy, ocean-hiding moon .
However, these funding levels aren't yet in effect.
A long and complex process remains before NASA knows its actual budget for fiscal year 2018, which runs from October 1, 2017 through September 30, 2018.
Congress can ultimately ignore the president's budget or parts of it, as it has done in the past. But President Trump can also ignore or veto Congress' big new NASA bill — legislation that won't become a law without a presidential signature.
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155 d ago
Trump's budget details billions in spending on the border wall
REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton
President Donald Trump laid out his plans for funding a wall along the US-Mexico border as part of the White House's budget blueprint released Thursday, detailing an initial payment for the wall's design and construction and plans for a hiring spree within immigration-enforcement agencies.
The budget proposal includes a $2.6 billion investment on "tactical infrastructure" and designs and planning for the wall as well as $314 million toward hiring and training 500 border-patrol agents and 1,000 Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers in 2018.
"This investment would strengthen border security, helping stem the flow of people and drugs illegally crossing the US borders," the proposal said.
The blueprint also proposes an additional $1.5 billion toward detaining and deporting unauthorized immigrants and $15 million for a mandatory national E-Verify system meant to cut down on unauthorized employment. The program would allow for businesses to determine whether new employees are eligible to work in the country.
Yet the budget proposal appears to fall short of early cost estimates for the wall's construction and maintenance, which could total as much as $21.6 billion, according to a Department of Homeland Security report last month. Trump himself previously cited a cost of $12 billion for the wall.
Mick Mulvaney, Trump's director of the Office of Management and Budget, told the news media on Wednesday that the White House could not yet estimate the total cost of the wall or how many miles it would cover.
Some GOP lawmakers have already expressed hesitation about the wall's funding, which Trump repeatedly promised on the campaign trail would be provided by Mexico.
"I don't care at all as long as Mexico's paying for it — it's neither here nor there for me," Republican Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona told The Washington Post on Wednesday. "But if we're paying for it, it's a significant concern."
Mulvaney said the funding in the budget blueprint "provides for a couple of different pilot cases," but the White House hasn't determined what type of construction a wall would consist of or where construction would start. He told ABC News' " Good Morning America " on Thursday that the budget proposal helped fulfill Trump's campaign promises.
"We took his words and turned them into numbers," Mulvaney said. "The president promised a wall — he's going to deliver it."
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155 d ago
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President Donald Trump released his preliminary 2018 budget plan last night, and it’s a bloodbath for scientific research. Not only does Trump’s plan slash funding for the Environmental Protection Agency, as he promised, he’s also proposing cuts to agencies that have a history of receiving broad bipartisan support — like the National Institutes of Health, one of the biggest funders of biomedical research in the world.
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Business Insider
155 d ago
Trump's proposed budget wants to chop $6 billion in biomedical research funding
Kevin Lamarque/Reuters
President Trump’s proposed budget chops $6 billion, about a fifth of the total budget, from the National Institutes of Health, a move that could decimate biomedical research in a number of areas and stagger academic institutions around the country that depend on NIH grant money to keep their scientific research programs afloat.
Research funding at the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency would also take steep cuts under the budget blueprint, released early Thursday.
The budget for the National Science Foundation isn’t specifically listed but it likely falls under the category of miscellaneous agencies targeted for across-the-board cuts of nearly 10 percent.
As for the pharmaceutical industry: Trump has repeatedly promised drug makers he’ll make it easier and cheaper for them to bring new medicines to market, but he’s also counting on them to pay more for their regulatory reviews. His budget calls for hiking the fees that industry pays the Food and Drug Administration to review medical products, arguing that companies “can and should” pay their fair share. Trump aims to bring in  $2 billion from these user fees in 2018, approximately double the current level.
Funding for the NIH has been a bipartisan priority for years; one of Trump’s key advisers, former Representative Newt Gingrich, has long championed that cause. It was just two years ago, in fact, that Gingrich called for doubling the NIH budget, calling health spending both a moral and a financial imperative. “It’s irresponsible and shortsighted, not prudent, to let financing for basic research dwindle,” Gingrich wrote then.
But Trump’s $1.1 trillion budget reflects new priorities in D.C.: The Pentagon, Department of Homeland Security, and Veterans Affairs would all get significant boosts in funding, offset by sweeping cuts across other domestic spending. The EPA and the State Department would be hardest hit, with each taking cuts of about 30 percent.
The Department of Health and Human Services comes in for a cut of more than $15 billion, or nearly 18 percent — a figure that includes additional funds for “program integrity and implementing the 21st Century Cures Act.”
Trump has talked often about the need to address the opioid crisis; his budget calls for a $500 million increase in spending to increase access to treatment and recovery services.
Trump’s budget proposal, which is slim on details, is just a blueprint; the details will be negotiated with Congress, and top Republicans have already made clear that they’re not on board with all the cuts. Just this month, Representative Tom Cole, who chairs a key appropriations committee, told STAT he hoped to boost NIH funding by as much as $2 billion this year. (The agency got its first significant budget hike in years, of $2 billion, in late 2015.)
And within hours of the blueprint’s release, Senator Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), who has also called for increasing NIH spending, issued a statement calling the president’s plan just the “first step” in a long a process. “There are many concerns with non-defense discretionary cuts,” Blunt said.
Senator Bernie Sanders went further, calling the budget “morally obscene.”
Tweet Embed:
https://twitter.com/mims/statuses/842391785422880773
Trump's budget is morally obscene and bad economic policy. It will cause pain to the people Trump promised to help.
 Advocates for scientific research, too, fired off sharp criticism. The proposed budget would “cripple” science and technology “through short-sighted cuts,” said Rush Holt, CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Though the details are sure to change, the budget document is important nonetheless in laying down a marker of the president’s priorities.
At the NIH, for instance, the plan calls for a “major reorganization” of the 27 institutes and centers that make up the agency. It outright abolishes the Fogarty International Center, which spends $69 million a year to  support research on global health and encourage collaboration between health research institutions in the US and in other nations.
The Fogarty center pushed back immediately on Twitter with a link to a page that lays out its funding for everything from Alzheimer’s research in Colombia to HIV treatment in South Africa to an effort to model the spread of infectious diseases.
Tweet Embed:
https://twitter.com/mims/statuses/842319124801961984
How we invest our $70 million budget to make a difference in #GlobalHealth #research : https://t.co/iqiGiimHzI
 Trump’s budget is quite vague on other spending targets in the realm of health and medicine.
There are no specifics listed for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, for instance, beyond a pledge to create a $500 million block grant fund to help states respond to their specific public health challenges. It’s not clear if that’s new funding or if it would be reallocated from elsewhere within the CDC. The budget also talks about unspecified investment in “mental health activities” such as suicide prevention.
Also mentioned in the document, without specifics: A plan to create a “federal emergency response fund” to address public health emergencies such as Zika.
The plan calls for “consolidating” the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, which among other things provides evidence-based guidelines for clinicians. It’s not clear whether, or how, the agency’s work would continue.
The budget doesn’t mention specific funding levels for Medicare and Medicaid, though the Republican health care bill moving through Congress would enact significant cuts to Medicaid spending.
Among the few specifics in the HHS budget blueprint: Trump would eliminate $403 million in funding to train health professionals and nurses, calling the program ineffective.
It proposes a modest increase, of $20 million, in the Department of Housing and Urban Development budget to mitigate health hazards such as lead-based paint in homes.
Dylan Scott and Megan Thielking contributed reporting.
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"You're spending money on eliminating supply, and that doesn't do much about the demand."
The budget also highlighted an increased spending of $175 million in the Department of Justice's budget to target drug traffickers, and specifically noted this was to help tackle the opioid epidemic from a law enforcement angle. But cracking down on drug dealers alone won't solve the problem, according to Katharine Neill, a drug policy postdoctoral fellow at Rice University in Houston.
"That's an old 'War on Drugs' tactic that we've seen in the past and it doesn't tend to work," Neill told me. "You're spending money on eliminating supply, and that doesn't do much about the demand."
Both Neill and Kolodny told me they're even more concerned by overall changes and cuts to healthcare. The Republican proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act will result in 24 million American losing health insurance coverage , according to the Congressional Budget Office. It would also rein in expansions for Medicaid coverage, leaving the most vulnerable Americans—many of whom are struggling with addiction—without care.
To tackle this deadly epidemic, the Trump administration needs to do more than set aside some law enforcement dollars to fighting drug dealers, the experts told me. The health care plan would need to be changed to ensure people can afford and keep insurance, the Food and Drug Administration would need to enact stricter regulations on drug marketing, and the federal government would need to expand funding for programs that include medication-assisted treatment (such as methadone), not just abstinence-based care.
But so far, the Trump administration hasn't addressed any of these other facets to slowly the toll of America's opioid crisis, and that's leaving experts troubled.
"We weren't in a great place before Trump came in and the things Trump is talking about doing, I do believe, will make the epidemic worse," said Kolodny.
USA Today
156 d ago
Bad news for low-income college students in Trump 2017 budget
Pell grants are safe but slashed. Other federal grants are going away.
         
 
 
Business Insider
155 d ago
Trump’s budget is a disaster for transit
Scott Olson/Getty
The Trump administration has released its budget blueprint [PDF], and it’s a bloodbath for everything that’s not defense spending. In keeping with the budget’s general hostility to cities, transit would be hit especially hard.
The Trump budget would eliminate funding for transit expansion projects unless a funding agreement is already in place, the Washington Post reports. For transit projects that have yet to reach that stage, funding from the Federal Transit Administration’s New Starts program — currently budgeted for $2.3 billion annually through 2020 [ PDF ] — would no longer be available.
Many cities have lined up local funding for rail and bus rapid transit projects under the assumption that it would be complemented by federal support. Without the New Starts funding, these projects will be in jeopardy as cities and transit agencies fend for themselves, either raising taxes, cutting other local priorities, or abandoning the expansion projects altogether to compensate. Dozens of projects would be affected:
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List of all transit projects in line for federal funds in the next few years, but which would have their funding cut with Trump budget. pic.twitter.com/Hkor98PiUD
The New Starts transit program only accounts for about 5 percent of federal surface transportation spending. The Trump budget outline doesn’t touch the lion’s share of those funds, which go to state DOTs to spend as they wish — mainly on roads.
Trump’s budget would also eliminate funding for TIGER, a smaller $500 million program initiated by the Obama administration to provide direct access to federal transportation funds for cities, transit agencies, and other local entities. Relative to overall federal spending, TIGER has paid for more walking, biking, and transit projects, such as Indianapolis’s Cultural Trail and Tampa’s Riverwalk. At Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao’s confirmation hearing in January, she said Congress members told her it was their favorite program.
Eliminating federal subsidies for transit has long been a goal of hard-right ideologues — but in the past these attempts have failed in Congress. Swing votes in the suburban ring of major cities that count on transit — including some Republican districts — have helped fend off the worst attacks. They will have to be mobilized again to stop this one.
More recommended reading today: Systemic Failure breaks down Ford CEO Mark Field’s assertion that fuel economy standards will cost a million jobs. And Price Tags writes that some residents of Sandusky, Ohio, are upset about plans to transform an industrial pier into park space — because 40 waterfront parking spaces will be eliminated.
NOW WATCH: A look inside the high-speed trains Amtrak will start using in 2021
CNBC
155 d ago
These budget cuts could be politically costly for the Trump administration
The Trump administration's proposed budget cut for a particular program could provoke political backlash in both red and blue states.
CNN
89 d ago
Breaking down Donald Trump's budget
John King is at the magic wall looking at the winners and losers of Donald Trump's budget blueprint.
The Daily Beast
155 d ago
Trump’s Budget Hits Trump’s Voters Hard
The real Americans the President valorizes are about to take it right on the chin from him.
CNN
155 d ago
Mulvaney: Trump's budget is compassionate
Director of OMB Mick Mulvaney describes President Trump's proposed budget, which cuts $3 billion from block grants used for programs like Meals on Wheels, as compassionate.
Gawker Media
155 d ago
Here Are All the Science and Technology Initiatives Trump’s Budget Would Decimate
As expected, President Trump’s proposed budget is a nightmare for science, the environment, and parts of the technology industry. Welcome to the future, where our long national nightmare may not even have the funds to keep chugging along.
Read more...
Business Insider
155 d ago
The biggest winners and losers in Trump's proposed budget
President Donald Trump proposed a $1.1 trillion budget. It would increase defense spending by $54 billion but other departments would see huge spending cuts. Funding for 19 agencies would be eliminated . Here are the biggest winners and losers. The budget proposal out Thursday is a White House wish list; it'll be up to Congress to decide where the money goes.
Entrepreneur
155 d ago
The Big Changes Proposed in President Trump's 2018 Budget
Congress must decide how to implement the administration's fiscal vision for the country.
Housing Wire
155 d ago
Trump’s budget to defund NeighborWorks America and other housing programs
President Donald Trump released his budget, which includes several cuts, such as a 13.2% decrease to HUD's budget. But other agencies, like Neighborworks America, are defunded entirely by the budget proposal. The agency responded by pointing out its achievements for the 2016 fiscal year.
CNN
155 d ago
Trump's first budget: A tough sell in Congress
CNN's Jeff Zeleny reports on the reception to the deep domestic cuts in Donald Trump's proposed 2018 budget.
CNN
154 d ago
How Trump budget cuts affect Meals on Wheels
A Michigan program director explains how the funding cuts could affect Meals on Wheels.
Daily Mail
155 d ago
Trump trolls global warming lobby by slashing budget
Climate science is one of the biggest losers when it comes to President Trump's proposed budget, which the administration unveiled today.
CNN
155 d ago
Trump budget chief on climate: 'Waste of your money'
President Donald Trump released a $1.1 trillion budget outline Thursday that makes good on a series of campaign promises, including cutting Environmental Protection Agency by about one-third.
ABC
155 d ago
Republicans dismiss Trump's first budget blueprint
Several GOP lawmakers spoke out against proposals within the budget.
The New Yorker
155 d ago
Donald Trump’s Voldemort Budget
Strictly speaking, the “skinny budget” that the White House published on Thursday isn’t a budget at all. It says nothing about roughly three-quarters of over-all federal spending, which goes to mandatory outlays such as Social Security, Medicaid, and interest on the national debt. It doesn’t include any projections for the deficit. And a Presidential budget isn’t binding. Ultimately, Congress sets spending levels. As Paul Ryan, the House Speaker, said on Thursday morning, “this is just the very start” of the budget process.
See the rest of the story at newyorker.com
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Has Paul Ryan Suckered Donald Trump Into Making Health Care His Top Priority?
The Saga of Tom Brady’s Jersey
How the First Amendment Applies to Trump’s Presidency
New York Times
155 d ago
Scientists Bristle at Trump Budget’s Cuts to Research
Scientists expressed alarm at the depth of proposed cuts to climate change, medical and energy programs, saying they threaten the nation’s research infrastructure.
ABC
155 d ago
WATCH: Key takeaways from President Trump's new budget blueprint
ABC News' Amna Nawaz and Shushannah Walshe, and Steve Ellis of Taxpayers for Common Sense highlight their key takeaways from President Trump's new budget.
WIRED
155 d ago
Trump’s Budget Would Break American Science, Today and Tomorrow
By eviscerating federal funding of science, this proposed budget pays for a world where the only infrastructure is megacities connected by Fury Roads. The post Trump's Budget Would Break American Science, Today and Tomorrow appeared first on WIRED .
Business Insider
155 d ago
Trump's proposed budget is already hitting a wall with some Republicans
REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
Several noteworthy Republican lawmakers signaled Thursday that they are so far unimpressed with President Donald Trump's first budget proposal, a plan that would slash popular services and programs and give a $54 billion boost to defense spending.
Trump's proposal has received mixed reviews in part for its deep cuts to humanities and arts programs, and services to disabled children and older Americans.
Members of Trump's Cabinet, including White House Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said programs like Meals on Wheels — the public service that provides hot meals to the elderly — "sound great," but it and other anti-poverty programs are "not showing any results."
The deep cuts are unsurprising. Trump has spent his campaign and the early months of his presidency touting promises to boost military spending and slash what he considers wasteful government spending. Still, Trump's moves have not gone unnoticed among Republicans. 
Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida said cuts to the State Department — the second-biggest loser in Trump's budget — "undermine America's ability to keep our citizens safe."
"American's leadership on the global stage is indispensable," Rubio said. "I will be working to ensure Congress' funding priorities allow America to play this role."
Sen. Lindsey Graham, who sits on the Senate Armed Services Committee, took a swipe at the budget's heavy focus on defense spending while cutting funds at agencies like the State Department.
"These increases in defense come at the expense of national security, soft power, and other priorities," he said.
"I look forward to working with my colleagues in Congress and President Trump to create a budget that is fiscally responsible, makes our country safer and preserves wise investments in our future," Graham added.
Rep. Ed Royce, who chairs the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said Trump's budget leaves too many unanswered questions.
"We need a strong reform budget that will improve the effectiveness and efficiency of foreign assistance. And we can achieve this without undermining vital US economic and national security interests," Royce said.
NOW WATCH: 'Sit down! Quiet!': Watch Trump's heated exchanges with reporters in his longest press conference as president
Reuters
155 d ago
Tillerson avoids public conflict with Trump over budget
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - While he has swallowed a big budget cut and had the White House veto his chosen deputy, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is avoiding a public conflict with U.S. President Donald Trump over his department's budget, six current and former U.S. officials said on Thursday.
CNN
155 d ago
Jones: Trump budget goes against campaign
Van Jones, host of "The Messy Truth," says that President Donald Trump's proposed budget plan goes against everything he ran for during the 2016 campaign.
New York Times
155 d ago
Canadians Fear Trump’s Budget Will Devastate Great Lakes
The mayor of a city in Ontario was blunt: “What good is it having lower taxes when you can’t drink the water?”
Fox News
155 d ago
Trump's first budget faces early Republican resistance
President Trump’s “America First” budget released on Thursday that calls for steep cuts to the State Department and Environmental Protection Agency was called by some Republican lawmakers as a pie-in-the-sky wish list that has little hope of coming out of Congress in tact.
The Wall Street Journal
155 d ago
Trump's Revealing Budget
So much political drama over such a small part of the federal fisc.
Co.Design
155 d ago
Trump's Budget Is An Assault On America's Creative Soul
It's petty, political, and dangerous.
It's petty, political, and dangerous.
The Trump administration recently submitted its 2018 budget proposal to Congress . As predicted, there are deep cuts to virtually every department. Some of the hardest hit ? The EPA (down 31%), the State Department (down 29%), and the USDA (down 21%), and the Department of Health and Human Services (down 18%).
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BBC
154 d ago
Trump budget: Meals on Wheels cutback prompts backlash
Charity tells the BBC some local groups could be cut by 30% if Trump plan goes through.
Gawker Media
155 d ago
These Agencies Would End Under Trump's Budget
Trump’s proposed budget outline isn’t exactly being met with open arms in Congress , partially because he wants to end funding for so many agencies and programs . Here are those agencies, along with a useful tool to see how other agencies would be affected.
Read more...
CNN
155 d ago
NYPD Commissioner blasts Trump's budget
New York Police Commissioner James O'Neill says President Trump's budget proposal would slash the city's counterterrorism budget.
The Verge
154 d ago
Trump’s biggest budget cuts to NASA: ranked
Out of all the federal agencies that received budget plans from President Donald Trump yesterday, NASA fared pretty well . The space agency is only facing a 0.8 percent cut in its overall budget — a relatively mild change compared to the Environmental Protection Agency, which could see its funding slashed by 31 percent.
Packed within NASA’s small budget decrease are some pretty sizable cuts
But packed within NASA’s small budget decrease are some pretty sizable cuts. A few major upcoming missions are canceled, and NASA’s entire education program, which is responsible for outreach and grants, is eliminated. The budget request also proposes wasting technologies already in space.
Some of these cuts could have a positive impact on NASA, while...
Continue reading…
Housing Wire
155 d ago
MBA: Trump’s budget shows political statement of priorities
The Mortgage Bankers Association explained President Donald Trump’s proposed budget shows housing is not a priority for the administration. The MBA explains it’s not just the cuts to HUD that show the president’s focus. The lack of housing direction in the budget can be just as telling as the funding cuts.
CNBC
154 d ago
Op-Ed: Trump’s budget blueprint is a war on the future of the American economy
There's nothing wrong with nostalgia as an emotion, but it's a terrible basis for a national economic strategy, writes Vox's Matt Yglesias.
Fox News
154 d ago
Celebrities react to Trump's proposed budget cuts for the arts
Hollywood stars took to social media to express what they felt about the proposed cuts made on Thursday.
USA Today
155 d ago
Republican budget experts say Trump budget dropped populism
The president's first budget fails to tackle debt but targets the vulnerable, critics say.
         
 
 
dezeen
154 d ago
Trump pledges $2 billion to Mexico border wall in budget proposal
US President Donald Trump 's first budget plan includes a sizeable downpayment on his promised wall along the country's southern border with Mexico. Read more
The Rolling Stone
154 d ago
Trump's Budget Is Pure Cruel Conservatism
The last Republican president, George W. Bush, branded himself a  compassionate conservative . In many ways Bush certainly did not live up to that principle, but he at least knew to pay lip service to the notion that conservatives should care for the needy while also tending to
This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: Trump's Budget Is Pure Cruel Conservatism
CNBC
154 d ago
Comparing Trump's budget changes to previous presidents'
Trump's proposed cuts are far different than the first budgets of his predecessors.
BBC
154 d ago
Trump budget: Global losers of 'America First' plan
The nations who would be most affected by the US president's "America First" proposals.
New York Times
154 d ago
Trump the Builder? Budget Blueprint Puts His Promises on Infrastructure in Doubt
Some have expressed disappointment over President Trump’s budget plan after campaign pledges that he would fix crumbling roads and “third world” airports.
ABC
155 d ago
Trump's defense budget boost raises questions on strategy
Plan for boosting the Pentagon budget by $54B is missing an essential element.
BBC
154 d ago
Trump's week: The budget, the ban and wire-tapping
This week in Donald Trump's White House: The budget, the ban and wire-tapping.
CNN
152 d ago
Chris Edwards: Trump's budget cuts are fair and necessary
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